This guide is intended for all students studying a Postgraduate Taught (PGT) course at Canterbury Christ Church University in 2021-22.

Who is this guide intended for?

This guide is intended for all students studying a Postgraduate Taught (PGT) course at Canterbury Christ Church University in 2021-22. This includes taught Master’s, Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip), Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert), Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) and Postgraduate Diploma in Education (PGDE).

There are two sets of regulations depending on the date you registered with the University. All Postgraduate Taught students are on the Regulations for Taught Awards; however, if you commenced your studies before September 2019 there is a set of regulations within the Regulations for Taught Awards which are specific only to you and certain regulations which don’t apply to you. These are clearly signposted.

Section 4 of this guide provides information on reassessment for Postgraduate Taught students who started their course of study from September 2019.

Section 5 of this guide provides information on reassessment for Postgraduate Taught students who started their course of study prior to September 2019.

If you are unsure which regulations you are on, please see Section 6 before reading further.

Students registered on a research degree, such as an MPhil, PhD, EdD, DClinPsychol or Master’s by Research should consult your research degree documentation. This guide does not cover Postgraduate Research.

Students studying for an Integrated Master’s degree should consult the Guide to Undergraduate Assessment and Award Processes.

To create a printable or PDF version of the information in this guide copy and paste the web address into the box here.

Why is this guide important to you?

All courses are governed by University regulations and processes that are designed to ensure that courses are structured, delivered and assessed in a fair, consistent and transparent way.

Understanding these regulations and processes will help ensure you have a positive learning experience and the best opportunity to succeed.

This guide provides key information about how assessment is carried out, the formal steps involved in making a final award and the University’s Regulation and Credit Framework that governs Postgraduate Taught courses.

Maximise your opportunity for academic success

To help you complete your course successfully, make sure you understand the contents of this guide and keep referring back to it throughout your studies.

Using this guide

It is your responsibility to be aware of, and understand, the content within this guide.

Reading this guide as a whole will help you understand the regulations for assessment and awards. You will also find certain sections relevant at particular times of the year, for example, as you prepare for assessments.

Please refer to your Course/Module Handbook for specific information on your assessments. If there is anything that you are not sure about, or if you would like advice or support, contact your Course Team who will link you with your Personal Academic Tutor (PAT) or additional support services. Alternatively, you can email any queries to i-zone@canterbury.ac.uk.

Top Tips!

To help you even further, where there is important information to note or Top Tips that we think you may be interested in we have highlighted this in blue.

Glossary of terms and definitions

To help you navigate this document, we have created a glossary of terms that can be accessed in Section 11. Each section also contains definitions relevant to what you are reading. Just click on the highlighted words to show the definition.

Section 1 : Your Postgraduate Course

Section 1: this section will tell you about expectations of Postgraduate Taught study, what your learning involves, types of courses and credit requirements, regulations for Individual Study.

1.1. Expectations of Postgraduate Taught Study

What are the expectations of Postgraduate Taught Study?

As a Postgraduate Taught student, you are making the transition to becoming a subject expert. In doing so you will have the opportunity to develop more in-depth command and understanding of subject knowledge and skills. You will be expected to engage in research and structured enquiry to a greater extent than at Undergraduate study. You will be producing more insightful work within your discipline.

Some Postgraduate qualifications lead to eligibility to apply for a particular professional registration or employment. You will be told about this in the course information.

Regardless of the type of Postgraduate Taught course, we expect you to develop an increasingly critical view and application of the areas you are studying. Across all Postgraduate courses, there is an expectation that you will undertake more self-directed and independent study. Your timetable will depend on your course.

Throughout your Postgraduate studies, you will be part of the Postgraduate academic community. We would expect you to continue to develop your transferable skills and graduate attributes. Particularly important are critical thinking, writing skills, analytical skills and the ability to reflect on your own learning journey.

1.2. Learning Expectations

What am I expected to learn?

Each Postgraduate Taught course has been designed to enable you to gain specific knowledge and skills that meet the course learning outcomes as detailed in your Course Handbook.

There are set learning outcomes that you must achieve to complete your modules in order to progress through your course and achieve an award or credits.

Throughout your modules, you will undertake regular assessment activities that will test your achievement of the learning outcomes. Assessment can be both summative and formative, and you can learn more in Section 2.

Fig.1 shows how all modules are constructed. You can see how the learning outcomes relate to the final assessment and your learning and teaching activities.

Fig.1: Building blocks of modules

The building blocks of modules are the module aims, learning outcomes, module content, module activities and assessment

1.3. Learning Activities

What activities will make up my learning?

A variety of activities will be used in class, on Blackboard (the University's Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)) and through other digital and physical means, to support your development of the knowledge, skills and attributes that allow you to meet the requirements of your course.

Fig.2: Possible learning activities

The types of learning activities are blended learning, work-related experience, individual and group tutorials or supervision, practice based learning, work based experience or placement, independent learning, problem-based learning and collaborative learning

Some of these activities will occur in many of your modules, while others will be specific to one or two modules, whose titles will reflect the nature of the learning. For example, an Individual study module will consist of independent learning with guidance from a supervisor. Learning related to the workplace may occur in a number of different forms and be embedded in many of your modules. In some courses, you may have a placement or a work-based learning module where you attend a workplace for a significant portion of your learning.

1.4. Postgraduate Taught Credits

How many credits do I need to achieve my Postgraduate Taught award?

Each course consists of modules that together have a total value of credits as set out in FIG.3. Modules typically have a value of 20, 40 (or occasionally 10) credits. MA and MSc awards often include a dissertation or Individual Study which will be 40 or 60 credits.

You must always check that you are studying the correct amount of credits. If you are not sure, refer to your Course Handbook/ Handbook or talk to your Course team including your Personal Academic Tutor (PAT) as soon as possible.

There are a number of Postgraduate Taught awards available. Your award will be based on the course that you are studying and the type of award that you registered to complete.

Fig.3: Postgraduate taught awards

AWARD FULL COURSE NAME CREDITS
PG Cert Postgraduate Certificate of Higher Education 60
PG Dip Postgraduate Diploma of Higher Education 120
PGCE

Postgraduate Certificate in Education

Professional Graduate Certificate in Education

60 at Level 7

60 at Level 6

PGCE Further Education

Postgraduate Certificate in Education - Further Education

Professional Graduate Certificate in Education - Further Education

120 (at least 40 at Level 7 and up to 80 Level 6)

120 (20 or fewer at Level 7 and the remainder at Level 6)

PGDE Postgraduate Diploma in Education 120 at Level 7
MA Master of Arts 180
MSc Master of Science 180
MMUS Master of Music 180
MCh Master of Surgery 180
MBA Master of Business Administration 180
MEd Master in Education 180
MTL Master in Teaching and Learning 180

If you do not achieve a pass in all the required credits on your first attempt, you will normally be entitled to further reassessment attempts in order to give you the opportunity to achieve a pass (for further information on reassessment, see Section 3 if you registered on your course of study from September 2019 and Section 4 if you registered prior to September 2019).

You may receive an award at a lower level than for which you registered. If you have not fully passed your course , you may have achieved sufficient credits for an interim award. For example, if you registered for and are studying for a MA but do not achieve the full 180 credits and leave the course with 60 credits, you would be eligible to receive a PGCert. When you exit a course, you will receive a transcript of any credits achieved and, if you are eligible, any interim award.

1.5. Course Structure

How is my Postgraduate Taught course and academic year structured?

Course Structure

Your course is made up of a series of modules (usually of 20 credits each) which allow you to achieve the set learning outcomes (see sections 1.1 and 1.3). In some courses, all modules are core whilst in others, you have a mixture of core and optional modules. Core modules are those that the University has deemed essential to the achievement of the learning outcomes of the course, which means that all students on the course need to study them. Optional modules allow you to focus on a preferred area within your domain of study, or to discover a new topic. If your course offers optional modules, then at set points you will be required to select your preferred modules.

Academic Year Structure

Your course may be delivered over one or more academic years. Some University courses operate on a semester academic calendar where each year is divided into two semesters. Some operate on a trimester or term-based academic calendar where each year is divided into three trimesters or terms. Some academic calendars also include additional weeks designed to provide you with time away from your studies to support your academic learning and personal development. Your Course/Module Handbook will clarify which academic calendar your course is on. You can view all the academic calendars here.

1.6. Individual Study

What are the rules for Dissertations or Individual Study?

A Master's degree will usually include a dissertation or Individual Study module of 40 or 60 credits at Level 7. Where a Master's degree includes both sizes, you will be permitted to take a maximum of 60 credits on such modules.

Section 2: Postgraduate Taught Assessment

Section 2: This section will tell you about Undergraduate assessment and the marking process, including what assessment involves, when and how you are assessed and given feedback, how your assessment activities are submitted, how your assessment activities are marked, the requirements for passing modules (pass threshold), and what happens if you do not meet the pass requirements (pass threshold)

Assessment

What does assessment involve?

You can expect to be assessed in each module of your course.

During assessment, you are tested on your ability to demonstrate the knowledge and skills that have been set out in the learning outcomes for a module.

See Fig1 in 1.2 to understand more about how learning outcomes relate to your final assessment.

There are two types of assessment you will encounter: formative and summative:

  • Formative assessment can take place throughout your module. It might take the same form as the summative assessment or test specific knowledge e.g. it could be an online or in-class quiz or questions in a seminar or tutorial. You may be given a mark for this assessment, but it will not contribute to your overall module mark.

Formative assessment provides you with feedback and an opportunity for you to see how well you are doing and what you need to do to improve in advance of your summative assessment(s).

  • Summative assessment(s) - following this assessment, you will receive a mark that comprises or contributes to your overall module mark. The mark is based on set marking criteria, which can be found in your Course/Module Handbook. What that mark means and how it is agreed is covered in 2.8.

Feedback on your assessment could take many forms.  To learn more about how feedback on your assessments can help you, see 2.7.

Throughout this guide, where the term assessment is used this refers to summative assessment.  Any references to formative assessment will be clearly indicated.

Forms of Assessment

What form does an assessment take?

Your learning is assessed in a number of ways so that you, and the University, can be sure that you are gaining the required skills, knowledge and marks to enable you to progress and achieve your desired award. The main categories are Examinations, Practicals, Coursework, and Set Exercises.

Fig.4: Four main ways your work may be assessed

The four main ways your work is assessed are exams, set exercises, coursework and practials

Depending on the assessment activity, you could be assessed as an individual or as part of a group. The assessment could occur in a placement or work-based learning setting.

Whatever form the assessment takes, the key thing is that it must allow you to demonstrate the learning outcomes of the module. You must make sure that you understand the learning outcomes and are clear about what is expected of you.

Information and guidance about the learning outcomes and the assessments you will be required to complete for your modules are available in your Course/Module Handbook and via your Module Tutor.

2.3. Placement Assessments

If I have a placement, how will I be assessed?

Assessment of placement is as important as any other assessment activity you may undertake. It allows your course to assess a number of things, for example:

  • How you have applied knowledge and theory in different settings
  • What activities you have done and the learning you have gained from them
  • How you have experienced a placement and reflected upon it

Your assessment may also include an assessment of practice competencies or standards.

Placement assessment may take place during or after your placement. It may be carried out by one of your tutors or by someone who works at your placement who has specific expertise in that area. Some placement assessments have a mark and some are pass/fail, depending on your module and course. Placement assessments may be subject to different reassessment regulations and it is important that you check your course regulations carefully.

2.4. Assessment Timing

When do my assessments take place?

Assessment is an ongoing process throughout your course.

Depending on the course and modules you undertake, assessment activities could be spread throughout each module. You may also be assessed at the end of a module, semester/trimester (depending on the academic calendar for your course). For Apprenticeship qualifications, there is an additional assessment point after completion of the academic qualification. This is called an End Point Assessment (EPA).

At the beginning of each semester/trimester, you will be provided with written details of the assessment activities and the methods of assessment and formal feedback that will be used. This will normally be provided in your Course /Module Handbook and on the Blackboard module site and information will include:

  • Descriptions of each assessment activity
  • Suggested reading lists
  • A schedule of assessment activities including the completion and submission dates and the dates by which you will receive formal feedback
  • Feedback methods

Where details of assessment activities are not available in your Course /Module Handbook or Blackboard, they will be confirmed to you in an alternative form.

Where your assessment includes examinations, your Course Team will notify you in advance of the formal arrangements.

It is important to ensure you know the dates for your course, including when your classes start and end, the specific times that you are required to attend the University and formal assessment and reassessment periods (you can learn more in the Student Engagement Policy). Assessment periods vary depending on the academic calendar your course follows, which is stated in your Course Handbook.

To learn more about your Academic calendar and accessing your personal student timetable, please speak with your Course Team and check the student webpages.

2.5. Submitting Assessment

How do I submit assessment activities?

Your Course /Module Handbook will contain specific information about the process for submission of work and completion of assessment activities.

You will normally be asked to submit your coursework assessment activities through Turnitin. This online service also allows you to upload draft versions of your assessments prior to final submission, and is designed to help you and your tutors check your work for originality and help guard against plagiarism.

Turnitin is accessed through Blackboard.

It is important that you always check you have received a receipt confirming your submission to Turnitin was successful, and that you keep those receipts until the end of your year of study.

There are some exceptions for the submission of draft work, please check your Course Handbook/Module Handbook for guidance.

For guidance on how to use Turnitin, please refer to the Help area within Blackboard.

Where you are asked to submit your assessment activity through a different route from Turnitin, your Course Team will explain the process. 

2.6. Deadlines

What happens if I am unable to complete my assessment activity on time?

It is important that you complete all your assessments on time. There are firm assessment submission deadlines with penalties for late submission of work unless you have been granted an extension or deferral.

Assessments usually have a deadline of 2pm on the day of the deadline published in the Module Handbook and Blackboard.

Late Penalties

In the case of late submission of coursework without an approved extension, the work will be penalised. The penalty applied by most courses will be 5% (of the eligible mark) per day, for up to 7 days, after which a mark of zero will be recorded.

For assessments whose deadline is 2pm, the calculation of the penalty is done using a 24-hour period. A penalty of 5% is applied from 2:01pm on the day of the published deadline. The “second day” of penalty starts at 2:01pm the day after the published deadline, and so on for a total seven days. The calculation of “days” includes Saturdays, Sundays and bank holidays.

The penalty may differ for assessments that are only marked as pass/fail and for assessments that must meet specific Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Body (PSRB) requirements. In these cases, you will find details of the penalties in your Course Handbook/Module Handbook.

Failure to attend an examination without approved extenuating circumstances will automatically result in a mark of 0%.

Extensions and Deferrals

The University has a variety of mechanisms to support students who are experiencing issues when undertaking assessments. If you have a problem or concern, it is important to contact your Personal Academic Tutor (PAT) as soon as possible to ensure you get the right support. Support is also available from the University’s Support Service, email: studentwellbeing@canterbury.ac.uk

Sometimes there may be circumstances that affect your ability to undertake an assessment. For short-term problems affecting you for up to 1-2 weeks, you may be eligible to apply for a self-certification extension or an evidence-based extension (or an alternative date if it is a timed assessment) through Extenuating Circumstances. To find out more about Extenuating Circumstances and access to the forms you need to complete to submit a request, view the Extenuating Circumstances webpages.

For medium and longer-term issues there are also support mechanisms in place for which you may be eligible.

Contact your Personal Academic Tutor (PAT) for advice. Or View the extenuating Circumstances webpages

Following the formal dates set for confirming module results, if the University grants you an extension that sets a new submission or examination date this is called a deferral (read more in 2.8). Where your first attempt at an assessment is deferred, your marks will not be capped when you take that attempt. In most cases, you must complete your deferred assessments within the same academic year in which you first study the module. If not, you will lose a reassessment attempt (for more information, see 4.5. if you registered from Sept 2019, or 5.5. if you registered prior to Sept 2019).

2.7. Assessment Feedback

How will be given feedback on my assessments?

Feedback is provided in a number of forms and delivered in different ways. It could be verbal or written, online or paper; it can come from your Module Tutor or your fellow students depending on the type of assessment and the marking criteria (these can be found in your Course /Module Handbook).

The aim is to provide you with timely and useful feedback within 15 working days of the submission date. For certain modules and assessment activities such as dissertations, extended projects, Individual Study, formal examinations and work submitted after the deadline, there is an extended period for feedback.

Feedback plays a valuable role supporting your learning development and helping you identify areas for improvement.

Marking

How are assessments marked?

The marking process for your assessment activities is rigorous and thorough and is based on approved marking criteria as detailed in your Course /Module Handbook.

Marking is carried out by examiners approved by Canterbury Christ Church University and is then reviewed by subject specialists from other institutions (External Examiners) who are part of a formally convened body (a Board of Examiners) that is responsible for confirming students’ marks and progression and granting awards.

Fig.5: Key stages when marking your assessments

STAGE MARKING PROCESS
1 Completed assessment activities are marked by an approved examiner.
2

Assessment activities are then either:

  • Moderated, meaning a sample of the marked assessment activities is reviewed by a University-approved examiner to ensure that the criteria for assessment and arrangements for feedback have been appropriately applied or
  • Double marked (where required by the University's Regulation and Credit Framework), meaning the summative assessments for all students are reviewed by a second approved examiner.
3 Once moderation or double marking is completed, a provisional mark is allocated to your work and published on the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) (e.g. Blackboard Turnitin, Pebblepad). This is the mark pre-penalties or caps. This mark does not include any potential penalties you may have incurred if submitting the work late. Neither does it include any cap because it is a reassessment.
4 Once assessment activities are completed and marks are published on the VLE, a sample of those marked assessment activities is then reviewed by an External Examiner.
5 At the end of a semester/trimester or term, final module marks are confirmed by a Module Board of Examiners which is attended by University examiners with input from the External Examiner. Following the Board, you will receive your results via your CCCU University email and can also access them via the ‘Programme/Course Information’ tile at Your Services. These marks are inclusive of any penalties (for lateness) and caps (if reassessment).
6 At the end of a level of study, final module marks are considered by a Progression and Award Board of Examiners. This board confirms student progression, reassessment (if required) and grants awards.

Your Course Team will be able to advise when the different boards are meeting dependent on your academic calendar.

TOP TIP: If you have any questions about the process for marking assessments, please speak with your Course Director.

2.9. Postgraduate Taught Pass Mark

What is the pass mark?

The pass mark for a Postgraduate Taught module is 50%. In addition, in order to complete an award, your calculated average overall mark must be 50% or greater.

The mark you receive for each module studied is calculated based on what you receive for each individual assessment that you have completed. Each mark is given an assessment weighting and this is used to calculate your final mark for each module. There may be some professional modules where some or all of the assessments are pass/fail and no marks assigned.

There are some modules where you need to pass all assessments in the module, in order to meet specific Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Body (PSRB) requirements. Where this is applicable, details will be provided in your Course Handbook/Module Handbook.

Fig.6: Examples of module mark calculations based on assessment weightings.

These examples illustrate the calculation of a module mark based on two assessments where one is coursework, while the other is an examination (the assessment weightings vary).

  Assessment 1 Assessment 2  
  % weighting of assessment mark Mark received % weighting of assessment mark Mark Received Combined final module mark Module Outcome
Example 1: Pass with a combined average mark above 50% 70% 78% 30% 55% 71% Pass
Example 2: Pass with a combined average mark above 50% (Weightings reversed from Example 1) 30% 78% 70% 55% 62% Pass
Example 3: Fail with a combined average mark below 50% 30% 58% 70% 30% 45%* Fail
Example 4: Pass with a combined average mark of at least 50% 30% 64% 70% 43% 50% Pass
Example 5: Fail where although the combined average mark is at least 50%, the PSRB regulations state that you must have passed all your assessments and Assessment 2 does not meet those requirements 30% 64% 70% 43% 50% Fail

*If you meet certain criteria, this may be eligible for compensation (see 3.2 for more information).

Pass requirements

Do I need to achieve a pass in every module?

Yes. You must normally achieve a pass (50% or greater) in each of your modules in order to achieve the required number of credits for your award.

To understand more about the number of credits required for your award see 1.5.

For modules studied from September 2019, if you do not achieve 50% or greater in a module you may be granted a compensated pass for a limited number of credits if you meet certain specific conditions.  You can learn more about compensation in 3.2.

2.11. Outcomes of Marking

What are the possible outcomes following the marking process?

At the end of a semester/trimester you will be given formal notification of the marking outcomes for the modules completed.

The possible outcomes are:

  • passed modules and continue with your course
  • did not pass a module(s) and undertake reassessment. The timing of this will be confirmed to you in writing. In most cases, you will continue with your new modules while preparing for reassessment
  • did not pass a module(s) and you have exhausted your reassessment opportunities and are required to withdraw.

For further information about the marking process, please refer to the University's Regulation and Credit Framework.

To learn more about reassessment, see Section 4 if you started on your Postgraduate Taught course of study from September 2019, and Section 5 if you started on your Postgraduate Taught course of study prior to September 2019.

2.12. Module Results

How will I find out my module results?

Details on how you will receive your results will be set out in your Course Handbook.

Section 3: Achieving My Postgraduate Taught Award

This section will tell you about the requirements to achieve an award, and compensation.

3.1. Achieve an Award

What must I do to achieve an Award?

Your course is made up of modules (learn more in Section 1).

You must normally pass all of your modules in order to achieve the intended award unless you are granted Compensation (learn more about compensation in 3.2). The decision about your achievement will be made by a Board of Examiners who make all decisions about students’ module marks and achievements, and have to adhere to the University’s Regulation and Credit Framework. A Progression and Award Board of Examiners will consider your total mark profile before confirming the decision about your achievement.

3.2. Passing with Compensation

What is passing with compensation?

Compensation is available for a maximum of 20 credits on awards of 120 credits or greater i.e. PG Dip or above.

If you are unsure whether Compensation applies to your course or module studied, please consult your Course/Module Handbook, or speak to your Personal Academic Tutor (PAT).

Compensation is only applied after all reassessment opportunities have been offered and a Progression and Award Board of Examiners confirms that:

For an award of 120 credits you have met all of the following criteria:

  • Passed modules to the value of at least 100 credits and
  • Obtained a mark of at least 40% in any failed module up to 20 credits and
  • Obtained an average mark of 50% or greater for all modules contributing to your award.

For an award of 180 credits you have met all of the following criteria:

  • Passed modules to the value of at least 160 credits and
  • Obtained a mark of at least 40% in any failed module up to 20 credits and
  • Obtained an average mark of 50% or greater for all modules contributing to your award.

Compensation is only applied when the full profile of marks covering all credits for an award are available to the Progression and Award Board of Examiners and all reassessment opportunities have been taken.

The actual mark for the compensated module will be included on your Academic Summary and official transcripts with the letters ‘CP’ to denote a Compensated Pass.

You cannot be compensated for part of a module or for a 40 or 60-credit module.

Fig.8: Examples that illustrate when compensation does and does not apply (where applicable within a course)

This example is based on a PGDip made up of 120 credits.

Based on 120 credits
6 x 20 credits
EXAMPLE 1 EXAMPLE 2 EXAMPLE 3
Marks achieved Marks achieved Marks achieved
Module 1 62% (pass) 69% (pass) 51% (pass)
Module 2 60% (pass) 58% (pass) 50% (pass)
Module 3 72% (pass) 72% (pass) 50% (pass)
Module 4 51% (pass) 55% (pass) 53% (pass)
Module 5 55% (pass) 61% (pass) 50% (pass)
Module 6 43% (fail) 39% (fail) 40% (fail)
Average mark awarded for all 120 credits 57% 59% 49%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OUTCOME:

✔ 100 credits passed

✔ 100 credits passed

✔ 100 credits passed

✔ 1 module failed but have achieved a mark of at least 40%

x 1 module failed and have not achieved a mark of at least 40% ✔ 1 module failed but have achieved a mark of at least 40%

✔ Achieved an average mark of at least 50% for all 120 credits

  x Have not achieved an average mark of at least 50% for all 120 credits
Compensation awarded Compensation not awarded. Compensation not awarded.

If compensation is available on your course, and you meet the criteria for compensation (limited to 20 credits on awards of 120 credits or greater), you may choose not to take a reassessment attempt that you are offered in favour of a compensated pass.

This would not be applied until the full profile of marks covering all credits for your award are available to the Progression and Award Board of Examiners.

If you decide not to undertake a reassessment opportunity you are offered, but instead receive compensation, you would receive the mark you achieved followed by 'CP' on your transcript.

3.3. Which Regulations

Which Regulations am I on?

Before reading about reassessment, make sure you know which regulations apply to you.

There are two sets of regulations depending on the date that you registered with the University. All Postgraduate Taught students are on the Regulations for Taught Awards.

However, if you registered on your Postgraduate Taught course prior to September 2019, there is a set of regulations within the Regulations for Taught Awards which are specific only to you and certain regulations which do not apply to you. These are clearly signposted.

Section 4 contains the regulations which apply to students who registered on their Postgraduate Taught Course from September 2019.

Section 5 contains the regulations which apply to students who registered on their Postgraduate Taught Course prior to September 2019.

If you are unsure which regulations you are on, please see Section 6 before reading further.

Section 4: Postgraduate Taught Reassessment Regulations from September 2019

Section 4: This section will tell you about the types of reassessment available, the timing of reassessment, and reassessment with attendance (RWA).

This section is ONLY for those of you who started on your Postgraduate Taught course from September 2019 onwards.

If you started on your Postgraduate Taught course of study prior to September 2019, go to Section 5 for information relevant to your reassessment.

2020-21 Covid-19 Regulations

In response to the disruption caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, the University made revisions to some of its regulations for 2020-21 academic year in order to support student progression and award.

This section applies ONLY to students who were studying in 2020-21 academic year.

The University recognised that Covid-19 had an impact your lives, your studies and potentially your assessments. As a result of the pandemic, and at key points since 23 March 2020, you may have experienced:

  • changes in your teaching, learning and assessment and you may have undertaken these changes in the context of other significant challenges.
  • Reduced ability to engage with assessment.

The University sought to respond in a compassionate, fair and transparent way, which supported student wellbeing and protected the integrity of your degree award to ensure your continued future success.

You will find the changes that applied in Academic Year 2020-21 detailed in the Guide for 2020-21.

You will find the changes that applied during Academic Year 2019-20 detailed in the Guide for 2019-20.

Please note: Some changes such as Compensation may not have been available in full for some courses with Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Body (PSRB) requirements.  Please speak to your Course Team or Personal Academic Tutor (PAT) if you are unsure how these policies applied to your course.

Regulation

Key change

2020-21 Progression with Compensation Covid-19

Please note this only applies to students who were studying in the academic year 2020-21.

We increased the number of credits available for compensation to 40 credits in 2020-21 only.

Please visit the ‘Progression with Compensation 2020-21 Covid-19’ page for full details.

No Detriment Policy

Please note: This policy only applies to students who were studying in 2019-20 and have continued their studies into the academic year 2020-21.

The University put in place a ‘No Detriment Policy’ to ensure that the outcome that you receive for academic year 2019-20 considers the impact that the Covid-19 Pandemic may have had on your assessed work.

Please see 4.19 for full details.

4.1. Understanding Reassessment

What is reassessment?

Reassessment provides you with a further opportunity to take and pass an assessment activity that you have attempted but not yet passed.

If you are granted a reassessment, this is known as a referral.  When you undertake reassessment, your mark for that reassessment activity will be capped at the pass mark (50%).

Under certain conditions, you may be granted an approved delay known as a deferral.  Where your first attempt at an assessment is deferred, your marks for that attempt will not be capped. In most cases, you must complete your deferred assessment within the same academic year in which you first studied the module.  If not, you will lose one of your two reassessment attempts.

There are two types of reassessment:

  • Reassessment: a further attempt at completing and passing an assessment activity, normally by submitting an improved form of your original work or taking another examination with different questions on the same subject.
  • Reassessment with Attendance (RWA): a further attempt at completing and passing assessment activities that require you to reattend and undertake reassessment in the modules that you have not yet passed, in the next academic year. This is to ensure you have sufficient learning to complete reassessment successfully.

You will be charged fees for Reassessment with Attendance (RWA).  Make sure you have read what these are when considering the reassessment options granted to you by a Board of Examiners.

4.2. What does reassessment involve?

What does reassessment involve?

The University's Regulation and Credit Framework governs how you are reassessed. Reassessment can take many forms and will depend on how you were assessed for your original assessment activity:

  • If you have not achieved a pass in your coursework, you will normally be required to submit an improved form of your original work for your reassessment
  • If you have not passed an examination, you will normally be required to take another examination but you will be required to complete different questions on the same subject

Other reassessments will be offered according to the type of assessment activity or according to an approved variation. Your Course Handbook/Module Handbook will set out the requirements for reassessment.

4.3. Placement Reassessment

If I have a placement, how will I be reassessed?

Placement assessments may be subject to different reassessment rules and regulations (for example, whether or not you can re-attend a placement).

It is important that you check any Special Regulations that apply to your course carefully.

The form of reassessment for your placement will vary based on the nature of your original placement assessment. For some reassessments, you may be able to improve your original assessment or undertake an alternative form of assessment. In some cases, you will only be able to be reassessed by re-attending a placement.

4.4. Number of Reassessment Attempts

How many reassessment attempts do I have?

Students have the right to two reassessment attempts. The first reassessment attempt will normally take place in the same academic year and you will not be expected to re-attend the module.

The second reassessment attempt is dependent on the marks you achieve following your first attempt. If you have achieved a mark of 40-49%, your reassessment will take place in the next assessment period without attendance.

If you have achieved a module mark below 40%, you will need to take Reassessment with Attendance (RWA) in the following academic year (read more in 4.7).

Fig.9: Summary of Reassessment Opportunities

  FIRST REASSESSMENT SECOND REASSESSMENT
    If after the first reassessment, module mark is 40-49% If after the first reassessment, module mark is 0-39%
When would my reassessment take place? Reassessment for modules not passed in each semester/trimester or term will take place in the next formal assessment period for your academic calendar, alongside your semester/trimester or term assessments (see 4.5 for more info) In the next formal assessment/reassessment period (depending on the academic calendar). Reassessment will take place as Reassessment with Attendance (RWA) in the following academic year.
What would this involve?

Where a module has not been passed, you would be required to undertake reassessment for only the assessment activities that have not been passed:

  • If you have not achieved a pass in your coursework, you will normally be required to submit an improved form of your original work for your reassessment.
  • If you have not passed an examination, you will normally be required to take another examination but you will be required to complete different questions on the same subject.

Where a module has not been passed, you would be required to undertake reassessment for only the assessment activities that have not been passed:

  • If you have not achieved a pass in your coursework, you will normally be required to submit an improved form of your original work for your reassessment.
  • If you have not passed an examination, you will normally be required to take another examination but you will be required to complete different questions on the same subject.

Reassessment with Attendance means that before you can achieve an award, you will be required to re-attend the modules that have not yet been passed and undertake reassessment for only the assessment activities that have not been passed. See 4.6 for more info.

What happens if I pass my reassessment? Your reassessment activity will be capped at the pass mark and your module mark will be calculated accordingly (see 4.8 for more information). Your reassessment activity will be capped at the pass mark and your module mark will be calculated accordingly (see 4.10 for more information). Your reassessment activity will be capped at the pass mark and your module mark will be calculated accordingly (see 4.8 for more information).
What happens if I do not pass a reassessment attempt?

You will be offered a second (final) reassessment attempt).

Compensation could be granted (if applicable). If the module mark is not eligible for compensation and you have not achieved a pass mark, you will be required to withdraw and will receive any credits and interim awards achieved.

See 3.2 for more information on compensation.

Compensation could be granted (if applicable). If the module mark is not eligible for compensation and you have not achieved a pass mark, you will be required to withdraw and will receive any credits and interim awards achieved.

See 3.2 for more information on compensation.

 

4.5. Timing of Reassessment

When do I take my reassessment?

You are required to undertake your first reassessment in the next formal assessment period of your academic calendar. This is normally at the end of the next trimester, semester or term, or, for modules in the final semester/trimester, in the reassessment period for your academic calendar. The specific dates for reassessment will be set out in your Course/Module Handbook or confirmed when your results are released.

Your second reassessment attempt, if required, will normally take place in the following academic year to your first reassessment attempt. The precise timing will be dependent on the outcome of your first reassessment (see 4.4).

It is important that you are available to undertake your reassessment at the specified time as these are formally set dates that cannot be changed. Unfortunately, the University is unable to make allowances for holidays or other commitments you may have scheduled.

In some cases, reassessment might affect the completion date of your course.

 

FIG.10 and FIG.11 below illustrate the timing of your first reassessment in semesters and trimesters.

Timing of first reassessment in trimesters
Figure 10
Timing of first reassessment in semesters
Figure 11

4.6. Module Changes and Reassessment with Attendance (RWA)

What is Reassessment with Attendance (RWA)?

After your first reassessment attempt, if your module mark is between 0-39%, the final assessment attempt (reassessment) must be taken as Reassessment with Attendance. This means a final attempt at completing and passing the assessment activities, requiring you to re-attend (in the following academic year) those modules that you have not yet passed.

How does Reassessment with Attendance work if my original module has changed?

Course teams make regular enhancements to your modules to ensure that your course remains current, aligns with recent research and provides you the best learning support. To minimise disruption to your experience, there are regulations to support how Reassessment with Attendance should be undertaken when a module has changed.

Most changes fall into three broad categories, summarised in Fig.12 below. Occasionally a module will be replaced by a different module, in those circumstances you will be granted additional assessment attempts that will still be capped in line with reassessment regulations.

If you are undertaking Reassessment with Attendance, you are expected to meet with your programme team to review and discuss what happens next.

FIG.12: How Reassessment With Attendance (RWA) works when there are changes to a module

How Reassessment With Attendance (RWA) works when there are changes to a module

4.7. Reassessment Restrictions

What are the conditions for reassessment?

There are two important conditions relating to reassessment.

  1. reassessment must be taken on the specified date(s).
  2. the University Regulations state in 13.16 of the Regulations for Taught Awards:

‘Where a component of assessment has not been passed after the first opportunity for reassessment, a student has a right to a second reassessment opportunity in all referred components of assessment, only where:

  • the regulations in 13.44 (related to placement reassessment) do not apply.

Make sure you attempt your assessments and reassessments at the times specified by the University for your academic calendar. Failure to do so may mean you are not eligible for further reassessment.

4.8. Reassessment Marks

What mark will I receive if I have to undertake reassessment?

If you undertake reassessment, your mark for that reassessment activity is capped at the pass mark. This includes any deferred reassessment attempts; however please note that deferral for your first assessment attempt is not capped.

Fig.13: Examples to show how capping is applied to reassessment.

In all examples, there are two assessments each worth 50% of the total module mark

  ASSESSMENT 1 ASSESSMENT 2 COMBINED TOTAL AFTER REASSESSMENT MODULE OUTCOME NOTES
Example 1: Where a module has two assessments and you pass one but not the other Coursework mark = 55%

Examination mark = 30%.

You are granted reassessment and achieve a mark of 60%.

This is then capped at 50% (pass)

52.5% Pass Capping for 1 reassessment at assessment level
Example 2: Where a module has two assessments and you have been unsuccessful in both

Coursework mark = 45%.

You are granted a reassessment and achieve 50% (pass)

Examination mark = 35%.

You are granted reassessment and achieve a mark of 57%.

This is then capped at 50% (pass)

50% Pass Capping for both reassessments at assessment level
Example 3: Where you have been granted a deferral on one of your original assessments Coursework mark = 65% Examination deferred to the next formal assessment period and once taken you achieve a mark of 55% 60% Pass A deferred assessment is not reassessment and therefore capping is not applied
Example 4: Where you have been granted a deferral on a reassessment Coursework mark = 65%

Examination mark = 25%.

You are granted a reassessment, which is then deferred. Once taken, you achieve a mark of 55%.

This is then capped at 50% (pass)

57.5% Pass Capping for 1 reassessment at assessment level (the deferral was for reassessment and so all capping rules apply).
Example 5: Where a module has two assessments of equal weighting and you have been unsuccessful in both*

Coursework mark = 45%.

You are granted reassessment and achieve a mark of 72%.

This is then capped at 50% (pass)

Examination mark = 20%.

You are granted reassessment and achieve a mark of 28%

39% (capping is applied to Assessment 1 due to being reassessment) Not Passed  

*In the case where a student is disadvantaged by the assessment level cap (i.e. when the student fails all components of assessment in a module and does not pass some components after reassessment), the reassessment cap will be applied at module level.

4.9. Application of No Detriment policy 2019-20

In 2019-20, the University put in place a ‘No Detriment Policy’ to ensure that the outcome you received for academic year 2019-20 would take into account any impact the Covid-19 pandemic may have had on your assessed work.

For those of you who continued your Postgraduate Taught studies from the 2019-20 academic year and are eligible to achieve an award, the No Detriment calculation applied in 2019-20 will be taken into account as part of your award classification.

You can read more on the No Detriment Policy and how it was applied below.

The No Detriment Policy applied to:

  • The delivery of Level 5, Level 6 and Taught Level 7 courses during the period when the University operated off-campus between 23 March 2020 and the end of the academic year, 2019-20 inclusive;
  • All students, including those on courses governed by a Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Body [PSRB], except where the application of the Policy is incompatible with PSRB requirements.
  • Where Levels 5, 6 or Taught Level 7 is used towards the classification of an award, either in the Academic Year 2019-20 or later.

Your average for Semester 1 or Trimester 1 modules studied in academic year 2019-20 was used as your No Detriment average.  We will compare your average with the calculation of the level of study normally used for degree classification. We will do this when we calculate your award classification and consider your overall performance in 2019-20. Where the calculation of the level we normally use for the degree classification is lower, we will use your average for Semester or Trimester 1 (your No Detriment average) to calculate your degree classification.

  • The modules used for calculating the No Detriment average were those from Semester 1 or Trimester 1 of the level you studied in 2019-20.* This means that we used the modules from that period in the calculation. This included where you passed a module by deferral or reassessment at a later point.
  • Modules, where teaching and assessment began in Semester 1 or Trimester 1 and extended into additional semesters or trimesters, were not included in the No Detriment average calculation.
  • The No Detriment policy applied only where you undertook more than 20 credits from Semester 1 or Trimester 1 by 23 March 2020, based on modules in your course. Where there were only 20 credits, then the mark for the 20 credits was used.
  • We used only the average for module marks from Semester 1 or Trimester 1. We did not use individual assessment marks.

*NOTE: For students who undertook dual-level modules, these were only included in the No Detriment average calculation where you achieved the target level.

Provided you were in a position to progress or gain an award, the No Detriment Policy was applied to your overall performance at the end of the 2019-20 academic year by the Progression and Award Board of Examiners.

The following arrangements applied to Part-Time Postgraduate Taught courses

1. Part-Time Students completing in 2019-20 during the period impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic.

All modules for your award up to the end of Semester 1 / Trimester 1 of 2019-2020 (including those undertaken from the previous year) will be used to calculate the No Detriment average.

2. Part-Time Students completing in 2020-21 or completing in subsequent years.

The modules for your award taken up to the end of Semester 1 / Trimester 1 in 2019-2020, as well as all the modules pertaining to your award taken from September 2020, will be used to calculate the No Detriment average.

Section 5: Postgraduate Taught Reassessment Regulations Prior to September 2019

This section is ONLY for those of you who started on your Postgraduate Taught course of study prior to September 2019 and will tell you about the types of reassessment available, the timing of reassessment, and Repeat Years.

This section applies ONLY those of who started on your Postgraduate Taught course of study prior to September 2019.

If you started on your Postgraduate Taught course of study from September 2019 onwards, go to Section 4 for information relevant to your reassessment.

Covid-19 Regulations 2020-21

In response to the disruption caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, the University made revisions to some of its regulations for the 2020-21 academic year in order to support student progression and award.

This section applies ONLY to students who were studying in 2020-21 academic year.

The University recognised that Covid-19 had an impact your lives, your studies and potentially your assessments. As a result of the pandemic, and at key points since 23 March 2020, you may have experienced:

  • changes in your teaching, learning and assessment and you may have undertaken these changes in the context of other significant challenges.
  • Reduced ability to engage with assessment.

The University sought to respond in a compassionate, fair and transparent way, which supported student wellbeing and protected the integrity of your degree award to ensure your continued future success.

You will find the changes that applied in Academic Year 2020-21 detailed on the following pages.

You will find the changes that applied during Academic Year 2019-20 detailed in the Guide for 2019-20.

NOTE: Some changes such as Compensation may not have been available in full for some courses with Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Body (PSRB) requirements.  Please speak to your Course Team or Personal Academic Tutor (PAT) if you are unsure how these policies applied to your course.

Regulation

Key change

Progression with Compensation 2020-21 Covid-19

Please note this only applies to students who were studying in the academic year 2020-21.

We increased the number of credits available for compensation to 40 credits in 2020-21.

Please visit the ‘Progression with Compensation 2020-21 Covid-19’ page for full details.

No Detriment Policy

Please note: This policy only applied to students who were studying in 2019-2020 and continued their studies into 2020-21.

The University put in place a ‘No Detriment Policy’ to ensure that the outcome that you receive for the academic year (2019-20) considers the impact that the Covid-19 Pandemic may have had on your assessed work.

Please visit the No Detriment Policy - Covid-19 page below for full details.

5.1. What is Reassessment?

What is reassessment?

Reassessment provides you with a further opportunity to take and pass an assessment activity that you have attempted but not previously passed. If you are granted a reassessment, this is known as a referral (read on for conditions). When you undertake reassessment, your mark for that reassessment activity will be capped at the pass mark (50%).

Under certain conditions, you may be granted an approved delay, known as a deferral. Where your first attempt at an assessment is deferred, your marks for that attempt will not be capped.  In most cases, you must complete your deferred assessment within the same academic year in which you first studied the module.

5.2. What does reassessment involve?

The University’s Regulation and Credit Framework governs how you are reassessed. Reassessment can take many forms and will depend on how you were assessed for your original assessment activity:

  • If you have not achieved a pass in your coursework, you will normally be required to submit an improved form of your original work for your reassessment
  • If you have not passed an examination, you will normally be required to take another examination but you will complete a different paper on the same subject

Other reassessments will be offered according to the type of assessment activity or according to an approved variation. Your Course Handbook/Module Handbook will set out the requirements for reassessment.

5.3. Placement Reassessment

If I have a placement, how will I be reassessed?

Placement assessments may be subject to different reassessment rules and regulations (for example, whether or not you can re-attend a placement).

The form of reassessment for your placement will vary based on the nature of your original placement assessment. For some reassessments, you may be able to improve your original assessment or undertake an alternative form of assessment. In some cases, you will only be able to be reassessed by re-attending a placement.

It is important that you check any Special Regulations that apply to your course carefully.

5.4. Number of Reassessment Attempts

How many reassessment attempts do I have?

You have the right to one reassessment attempt. Your reassessment attempt will normally take place in the same academic year and you will not be expected to re-attend the module.

See also 5.7 for information on Repeat Years.

5.5. Timing of Reassessment

When do I take my reassessment?

You are required to undertake reassessment in the next formal assessment period of your academic calendar. This is normally at the end of the next trimester, semester or term, or, for modules in the final semester/trimester, in the reassessment period for your academic calendar.  The specific dates for reassessment will be set out in your Course Handbook/Module Handbook, or confirmed when your results are released.

Fig.14: When you will take reassessment

In the initial academic year if you pass all 180 credits you achieved an award. If you do not pass the initial academic year you will be offered reassessment. If you pass all reassessments you will achieve an award. If you do not pass all reassessments you may be able to to repeat the failed modules in the next academic year.

It is important that you are available to undertake your reassessment at the specified time as these are formally set dates that cannot be changed. Unfortunately, the University is unable to make allowances for holidays or other commitments you may have.

In some cases, reassessment timing might affect the completion date of your course.

5.6. Reassessment Marks

What mark will I receive if I have to undertake reassessment?

If you undertake reassessment, your mark for that reassessment activity is capped at the pass mark. This includes any deferred reassessment attempts; however please note that deferral for your first assessment attempt is not capped.

Fig.14: Examples to show how capping is applied to reassessment.

In all examples, there are two assessments each worth 50% of the total module mark.

 

Assessment 1

Assessment 2 Combined total after reassessment Module outcome Notes
Example 1: Where a module has two assessments and you pass one but not the other Coursework mark = 55%

Examination mark = 30%.

You are granted reassessment and achieve a mark of 60%.

This is then capped at 50% (pass)

52.5% Pass Capping for 1 reassessment at assessment level
Example 2: Where a module has two assessments and you have been unsuccessful in both

Coursework mark = 45%.

You are granted a reassessment and achieve 50% (pass)

Examination mark = 35%.

You are granted reassessment and achieve a mark of 57%.

This is then capped at 50% (pass)

50% Pass Capping for both reassessments at assessment level
Example 3: Where you have been granted a deferral on one of your original assessments Coursework mark = 65% Examination deferred to the next formal assessment period and once taken you achieve a mark of 55% 60% Pass A deferred assessment is not reassessment and therefore capping is not applied
Example 4: Where you have been granted a deferral on a reassessment Coursework mark = 65%

Examination mark = 25%.

You are granted a reassessment, which is then deferred. Once taken, you achieve a mark of 55%.

This is then capped at 50% (pass)

57.5% Pass Capping for 1 reassessment at assessment level (the deferral was for reassessment and so all capping rules apply).
Example 5: Where a module has two assessments of equal weighting and you have been unsuccessful in both*

Coursework mark = 45%.

You are granted reassessment and achieve a mark of 72%.

This is then capped at 50% (pass)

Examination mark =20%.

You are granted reassessment and achieve a mark of 28%

39% (capping is applied to Assessment 1 due to being reassessment) Not Passed  

*In the case where a student is disadvantaged by the assessment level cap (i.e. when the student fails all components of assessment in a module and does not pass some components after reassessment), the reassessment cap will be applied at module level.

 

5.7. What is a Repeat Year?

What is a Repeat Year?

Where you do not achieve a sufficient overall pass and have exhausted all reassessment opportunities, a Progression and Award Board may offer you the opportunity to repeat your year of study.

You would be required to repeat the modules that have not been passed, including all the assessment activities for those modules. In a repeat year, you cannot submit work you submitted the previous year and the mark for the work is not capped.

You will be charged fees for a Repeat Year. Make sure you have read what these are when considering the reassessment options granted to you by a Board of Examiners.

5.8. Reassessment with Attendance (RWA)

What is Reassessment with Attendance (RWA)?

Reassessment with Attendance is not available if you registered on your Postgraduate Taught course of study prior to September 2019.

5.9. Application of No Detriment Policy 2019-20

In 2019-20, the University put in place a ‘No Detriment Policy’ to ensure that the outcome you received for the academic year 2019-20 would take into account any impact the Covid-19 pandemic may have had on your assessed work.

For those of you who continued your Postgraduate Taught studies into 2020-21 and are eligible to achieve an award, the No Detriment calculation applied in 2019-20 will be taken into account as part of your award classification.

You can read more on the No Detriment Policy and how it was applied below.

The No Detriment Policy applied to:

  • The delivery of Level 5, Level 6 and Taught Level 7 courses during the period when the University operated off-campus between 23 March 2020 and the end of the academic year, 2019-20 inclusive;
  • All students, including those on courses governed by a Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Body [PSRB], except where the application of the Policy is incompatible with PSRB requirements.
  • Where Levels 5, 6 or Taught Level 7 is used towards the classification of an award, either in the Academic Year 2019-20 or later.

Your average for Semester 1 or Trimester 1 modules studied in the academic year 2019-20 was used as your No Detriment average.  We will compare your average with the calculation of the level of study normally used for degree classification. We will do this when we calculate your award classification and consider your overall performance in 2019-20. Where the calculation of the level we normally use for the degree classification is lower, we will use your average for Semester or Trimester 1 (your No Detriment average) to calculate your degree classification.

  • The modules used for calculating the No Detriment average were those from Semester 1 or Trimester 1 of the level you studied in 2019-20.* This means that we used the modules from that period in the calculation. This included where you passed a module by deferral or reassessment at a later point.
  • Modules where teaching and assessment began in Semester 1 or Trimester 1 and extended into additional semesters or trimesters were not included in the No Detriment average calculation.
  • The No Detriment policy applied only where you undertook more than 20 credits from Semester 1 or Trimester 1 by 23 March 2020, based on modules in your programme. Where there were only 20 credits, then the mark for the 20 credits was used.
  • We used only the average for module marks from Semester 1 or Trimester 1. We did not use individual assessment marks.

NOTE: For students who undertook dual level modules, these were only included in the No Detriment average calculation where you achieved the target level

Provided you were in a position to progress or gain an award, the No Detriment Policy was applied to your overall performance at the end of the 2019-20 academic year by the Progression and Award Board of Examiners.

The following arrangements applied to Part-Time Postgraduate Taught courses

(i) Part-Time Students completing in 2019-20 during the period impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic.

All modules for your award up to the end of Semester 1 / Trimester 1 of 2019-2020 (including those undertaken from the previous year) will be used to calculate the No Detriment average.

(ii) Part-Time Students completing in 2020-21 or completing in subsequent years.

The modules for your award taken up to the end of Semester 1 / Trimester 1 in 2019-2020, as well as all the modules pertaining to your award taken from September 2020, will be used to calculate the No Detriment average.

Section 6: Which Regulations and Postgraduate Taught Assessment Regulations

This section sets out the different University regulations that govern Postgraduate Taught courses to help you understand why the regulations are relevant, which regulations apply to you and where to learn more about the regulations.

6.1. University Regulations

What are the University Regulations and why do I need to know?

The University’s Regulation and Credit Framework governs all courses and awards. This ensures each course and award is structured, delivered and assessed fairly, consistently and transparently.

The Regulation and Credit Framework covers a number of areas including – General, Taught Awards, Research Awards and Special Regulations.

Some of the most important information for you right now is likely to be the detail relating to assessment outlined below.

It is important to familiarise yourself with the Postgraduate Taught assessment regulations that apply to your learning, so that you understand:

  • How and when your work is assessed
  • Your entitlement to reassessment opportunities
  • The timing of reassessment
  • The requirements for passing assessment activities and modules (pass threshold)
  • The conditions relating to reassessment

The University has different Regulations that govern Postgraduate Taught assessment:

  • those for Postgraduate Taught students who registered at the University prior to September 2019 (see Section 5 for more information)
  • and those for Postgraduate Taught students who registered at the University from September 2019 (see Section 4 for more information)

Where the regulations differ, this is made clear in the Regulations for Taught Awards.

6.2. Which Regulations

Which assessment regulations apply to me?

The Postgraduate Taught assessment regulations were reviewed in 2018-19 in consultation with students and a number of changes were introduced in order to benefit Postgraduate Taught students. To support continuity of learning, limited changes apply to students who registered on their Postgraduate Taught Course of study prior to September 2019.

The differences in regulations are clearly indicated in the Regulations for Taught Awards.

Section 3 summarises the regulations which cover Postgraduate Taught assessment

Section 4 summarises the reassessment regulations which apply to those of you who registered on your PGT course from September 2019.

Section 5 summarises the reassessment regulations which apply to those of you who registered on your PGT course prior to September 2019.

Section 7: Awards and Classification

This section details the Postgraduate Taught awards that can be awarded by Canterbury Christ Church University and how they are classified, to help you understand the requirements for passing awards (pass thresholds) and the outcome you could achieve at the end of your course, and how the classifications for awards are calculated.

7.1. Types of Postgraduate Taught Awards and Classifications

What types of Postgraduate Taught Awards and classifications are there?

The University offers a range of Postgraduate Taught awards, which are classified in different ways. In all cases, classifications are based on the criteria set out in the University’s Regulation and Credit Framework.

Except for the Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) and Postgraduate Diploma in Education (PGDE), the classification operates in the following way for Postgraduate Taught Awards:

Each module is graded Fail/Pass/Merit/Distinction based on a rounded mark. The award is then classified by taking into account the number of Pass/Merit/Distinction marks you have achieved. For the PGCE and PGDE, once you have achieved a pass in all the credits for your award your final classification is calculated using your raw module marks.

Under no circumstances does an examiner or Board of Examiners have discretion to change individual marks.

Fig.15: The regulations for postgraduate taught awards and classification

POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN HIGHER EDUCATION (PG CERT)
Pass 50%+ Complete satisfactorily the requirements of the award on which a student is registered, and pass modules to the value of 60 credits at Level 7
POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN HIGHER EDUCATION (PG DIP)
Pass 50% - 59% Complete satisfactorily the requirements of the award on which a student is registered, and pass modules to the value of 120 credits at Level 7.
Merit 60% - 69%

For the Postgraduate Diploma (except where there is advanced standing of more than 40 credits), where a student passes the award and does not achieve a Distinction, but achieves a Merit or higher in the best 80 credits the award of Merit will be made.

For the Postgraduate Diploma where there is advanced standing of more than 40 credits (and there are no arrangements to import marks), where a student passes the award and does not achieve a Distinction in the best 60 credits, but achieves a Merit or higher in the best 60 credits the award of Merit will be made.

Distinction 70% and above

For the Postgraduate Diploma (except where there is advanced standing of more than 40 credits), where a student passes the award and achieves a Distinction in the best 80 credits the award of Distinction will be made.

For the Postgraduate Diploma where there is advanced standing of more than 40 credits (and there are no arrangements to import marks), where a student passes the award and achieves a Distinction in the best 60 credits the award of Distinction will be made.

MA/MSc/MMUS/MBA/MCh/MEd/MTL
Pass 50% - 59%

Pass at least 180 credits at Level 7.

Pass an extended module/dissertation at Level 7.

Merit 60% - 69%

A student must achieve a Merit in the best 120 credits OR achieve a Merit in the 60 credits that are not part of the Postgraduate Diploma curriculum.

Distinction 70% and above

A student must achieve a Distinction in the best 120 credits OR achieve a Distinction in the 60 credits that are not part of the Postgraduate Diploma curriculum.

POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN EDUCATION (PGCE)
Pass 50% - 59%

Pass modules to the value of 60 credits, or which 40 credits must be passed at Level 7, and the remainder may be passed at Level 6.

Complete successfully any required professional placement, including the submission of the requisite evidence to support the professional placement, whether such evidence is required before, during or after the completion of the placement.

Distinction 70% and above

Where a student passes the award and achieves an average mark of at least 70% across the best two modules at Level 7, where neither of these modules has a module mark of lower than 60%, the award of Distinction will be made.

PROFESSIONAL GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN EDUCATION (PGCE)

Pass

Pass modules to the value of 60 credits, of which at least 40 credits must be passed at Level 6, and the remainder must be passed a least at Level 6.

Complete successfully any required professional placement, including the submission of the requisite evidence to support the professional placement, whether such evidence is required before, during or after the completion of the placement.

POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN EDUCATION (PGDE)

Pass 50% - 59%

Pass modules to the value of 120 credits all of which must be at Level 7.

Merit 60% - 69%

For the Postgraduate Diploma in Education (except where there is advanced standing of 60 credits), where a student passes the award and does not achieve a Distinction, but achieves a Merit or higher in the best 90 credits the award of Merit will be made.

For the Postgraduate Diploma in Education, where there is advanced standing of 60 credits (and there are no arrangements to import marks), where a student passes the award and does not achieve a Distinction in the best 60 credits, but achieves a Merit or higher in the best 60 credits the award of Merit will be made.

Distinction 70% and above

For the Postgraduate Diploma in Education (except where there is advanced standing of 60 credits), where a student passes the award and achieves a Distinction in the best 90 credits the award of Distinction will be made.

For the Postgraduate Diploma in Education where there is advanced standing of 60 credits (and there are no arrangements to import marks), where a student passes the award and achieves a Distinction in the best 60 credits the award of Distinction will be made.

 

7.2. Problems with Completion

What happens if you cannot complete your award?

There could be a range of reasons why you are unable to complete your award as planned.

If you do not achieve an overall pass, a Progression and Award Board of Examiners will offer you a set number of reassessment opportunities in line with the University's Regulation and Credit Framework. In some instances, these may require you to re-attend a module (see Sections 4 and 5 for reassessment options and eligibility based on your year of registration with the University).

If you think you are unable to continue because of personal reasons or difficult circumstances, you should seek advice and talk through your options for taking a break from your studies with your Personal Academic Tutor (PAT) and the student wellbeing services. If you decide to take a break (formally known as an interrupt) or withdraw, you must meet certain conditions, including deadline dates for making changes. You will need to confirm your decision by completing a change of study request by visiting the student website.

In some cases, it may be necessary to withdraw from your studies before achieving your intended award. In these circumstances, you would receive a transcript of the modules studied/credits achieved and you may be eligible for an interim award. For example, if you leave an MSc or MA after completing 60 credits, you may be eligible to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert); if you leave after completing 120 credits, you may be eligible to achieve a Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip).

The University may withdraw you from your course in circumstances where you have failed to meet the University’s requirements and a Progression and Award Board of Examiners determines you are not allowed to continue on the course.

Section 8: Assessment Support Procedures

8.1. Extenuating Circumstances

It is important for you to complete your assessments, including examinations, on time but sometimes things happen outside your control that could affect your short-term ability to meet your deadlines.

If you are experiencing a short term (1-2 weeks), unexpected and unavoidable disruption to your studies (e.g. you have been ill or have difficult personal circumstances), which means that you have missed or are likely to miss an assessment/reassessment deadline, you may be able to request an extension or another opportunity for that assessment. Extenuating Circumstances can be used for both coursework and examinations/time-specific assessments.

Extensions or further opportunities granted through Extenuating Circumstances are not an automatic right. For an Extenuating Circumstances request to be approved you must have:

  • an acceptable reason
  • apply on time
  • not have exhausted your request opportunities, and
  • provide evidence if required.

The Extenuating Circumstances procedures include three ways you can apply for support if you experience a short-term issue (self-certification, an evidenced-based extension, and impaired performance).

On the Extenuating Circumstances webpage you will find more detailed information about each of these routes to support you.

8.2. Temporary Learning Agreements

If you are experiencing a medium-term or long-term personal difficulty (not related to disability), you may be eligible for additional support via a:

  • Temporary Learning Agreement (TLA), designed to help you manage your learning, so that you can successfully complete your level or stage of study within your current academic year.

In addition, if you require medium or long-term support related to a disability, you may be eligible for additional support via a:

To ensure you are able to benefit from any support, you are encouraged to talk to a member of your course team/Personal Academic Tutor (PAT) and also someone from the Student Support, Health and Wellbeing team, find out more on Support Services.

Section 9: Appeals and Complaints

This section outlines the procedures the University has in place to enable you to make appeals and complaints.

9.1. Appeals

There may be circumstances where you feel you have grounds to appeal against the decision-making process of a University body.

It is not possible to appeal against a mark for an assessment or placement, as that is a matter of academic judgement (against which students are not permitted to appeal).

Before making an academic appeal, you need to be clear whether you have grounds for appealing and ensure that you follow the appeals process.

It is also important to know that you are expected to submit an academic appeal within 20 working days of receiving the decision of the University body in question; the late application may mean the University is unable to consider your request. You should therefore ensure that you read through the appeals procedure and raise any concerns at the earliest point with the Student Procedures Office.

If you feel you want to make an appeal, support and guidance is available from the Students’ Union Advice Centre.

To learn more about the appeals process and making an appeal, visit the Academic Services web pages.

9.2. Complaints

The student complaints procedure provides you with an opportunity to raise, individually or collectively, matters of proper concern.

Most complaints can be resolved informally. Please raise the matter initially, as soon as possible, with either the member of staff concerned or that person’s immediate supervisor or manager. If after these steps you do not believe the issue has been resolved, a formal complaints process can be followed.

If you would like support in considering how to take forward any concerns you have, you can speak first to your Personal Academic Tutor (PAT), a member of your Course Team or your Student Representative. Support is also available from the Student Wellbeing Services, find out more on Support Services.

To learn more about the Student Complaints procedure, visit the Academic Services web pages.

Section 10: Further Information and Useful Links

For further information about University regulations, procedures and support, visit the following web pages:

Assessment procedures including University procedures and regulations:

Student procedures:

Other useful links:

Section 11: Glossary

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Academic Integrity is a set of values that we must apply to our academic work. It helps us learn how to use other people’s ideas when creating our own work.

We consider that breaches of Academic Integrity, which we call “Academic Misconduct”, fall into two broad categories: plagiarism and other types of misconduct.

Plagiarism is the practice of presenting and incorporating somebody else’s work and/or ideas into your work without full acknowledgment.

Academic Misconduct is any act of direct cheating, including the purchase or commissioning of assessments that are prepared by others. breaches of Academic Integrity are serious offences and may lead to a disciplinary procedure under the academic misconduct procedure

Learn more here.


ACCELERATED DEGREES [Applicable to Undergraduate students only]

Accelerated degrees, sometimes called fast track or two-year degrees, are full-time Undergraduate courses that cover the same learning as a typical three-year degree course, but are completed in a shorter time frame than usual. Accelerated degrees require students to attend more teaching weeks across the year, including during the summer months.


ADVANCED STANDING

The use of Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) to gain entry to a course later than the normal admission stage. Advanced Standing does not result in the award of credits by the University.


APPRENTICESHIP

In the context of this document, an Apprenticeship is a specific Apprenticeship course that provides you with an opportunity to work with an employer while developing academic and employment skills as part of a University degree or other course . The Apprenticeship qualification is awarded separately to the academic award when you successfully complete an external End Point Assessment (EPA).


ASSESSMENT

Your first attempt at an assessment activity.


ASSESSMENT ACTIVITY

An activity you undertake that is assigned an individual mark, and comprises or contributes to an overall module mark, e.g. examinations, coursework, practicals and set exercises or other types of formally marked activities undertaken as part of a course.


ASSESSMENT WEIGHTING

Sometimes, your assessments will have different percentage weightings. Assessments that are awarded the same mark will therefore contribute differently to your overall module mark. For example, you might have two assessments in a module, with one worth 30% of the overall module mark and the other worth 70%.


AWARD

Your achievement at the end of your course or studies. This could include a certificate, diploma, degree or Master’s.


AWARD CLASSIFICATION

The grade that you will receive when you complete your course. For a Bachelor's degree award, you will receive either a 1st class, Upper Second class, Lower Second class or Third class degree if you pass. For a Foundation Degree, a Certificate in Higher Education, a Diploma in Higher Education, or a Postgraduate Taught award you will receive either a Distinction, Merit or Pass if you pass. Other taught awards are not classified.


BLACKBOARD

This is the University's Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) and is the place where your lecturers will post module and assessment information, as well as lecture, revision and other study materials.


BLENDED LEARNING

Blended Learning refers to learning design that purposefully, thoughtfully and effectively integrates on-site face-to-face and online learning opportunities, informed and driven by student needs.


BOARDS OF EXAMINERS

Formally convened bodies, comprising members of the University and one or more External Examiners that approve marks and decide on your course progression and achievements. There are two types of Boards of Examiners: Module Boards of Examiners, and Progression and Award Boards of Examiners.


CLOSEST REASSESSMENT PERIOD

The designated period for reassessment set out in your academic calendar, which in most instances is as close as possible to when your original assessment took place.


COLLABORATIVE PROVISION

Collaborative provision is where learning opportunities leading to or contributing to the award of academic credit or a qualification are delivered, assessed or supported through an arrangement with one or more organisations other than the University. In these arrangements, students will be studying either for an award of the University or for a joint award with another awarding body. The standards of the award are set and maintained by the University alongside any other awarding bodies.


COMPENSATION

If you do not achieve a module pass mark but you meet specific criteria, a Board of Examiners may confirm a Compensated Pass for a module, which allows you to pass a level of study and progress or achieve an award. Some courses and awards have approved Special Regulations that do not permit Compensation due to professional and/or employer requirements.


CONTINUOUS PROGRESSION [Applicable to Undergraduate students only]

Where you complete your course in the expected period of time without interrupting your studies, taking a repeat year or undertaking reassessment with attendance (RWA). For example, you register for a three-year course and complete within three years.


COURSE APPROVAL

Where a new course is given academic and, where appropriate, professional approval by the University. The approved documentation is referred to as the validation document or course specification.


COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES

A statement of specific skills and knowledge that you will be able to demonstrate upon successful completion of a course.


CORE MODULE

Core modules are modules students are required to take as part of an award.


CREDITS

A numerical value agreed across the Higher Education sector that indicates the amount of learning undertaken. Credits can also guide the number of hours of expected study, for example, 10 credits relate to a notional 100 hours of learning time. A module typically consists of 20 credits, 40 credits or occasionally 10 credits. Postgraduate Taught may also include modules of 60 credits.

DEFERRAL OF AN ASSESSMENT ACTIVITY

Where an approved delay for the completion of an assessment activity is granted (by a Board of Examiners).


DISSERTATION

See Individual Study.


DOUBLE MARKING

Process whereby a second examiner ensures that the criteria for assessment and arrangements for feedback have been appropriately applied through the review of every piece of assessment.


END POINT ASSESSMENT (EPA)

A specific assessment for Apprenticeships that usually takes place following the completion of an Apprenticeship academic award and leads to the full external Apprenticeship qualification. This demonstrates that the apprentice has achieved the occupational competence as set out in the standards.


EXAMINER

A member of the University who is responsible for marking assessment activities and who is a member of a Board of Examiners. All University academics are examiners.


EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES

Personal circumstances that are outside of your control, and are likely to have a significant impact on your assessments and overall academic success.


EXTERNAL EXAMINER

Subject specialists from outside of the University who are appointed to provide an impartial view on the standard of awards being made by the University to ensure they meet required standards and national expectations.


FAILURE OF A MODULE

Where you do not achieve the module pass mark or standard, and you are not eligible for reassessment.


FAILURE OF AN ASSESSMENT ACTIVITY

Where you do not achieve the assessment activity pass mark or standard, and you are not eligible for reassessment.


FIRST REASSESSMENT

The first opportunity to undertake reassessment in an assessment activity that has not been passed.


FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT

Continuous assessment activities that take place before summative assessment and which are designed to monitor your progression and provide feedback in order to develop learning. These do not contribute to your module mark.


FOUNDATION DEGREE

An undergraduate award which is the equivalent of two-thirds of an honours degree (Level 4 and Level 5) that combines academic study and work-based learning. A Foundation Degree usually involves two-years of full-time study.


FOUNDATION YEAR

The first year (Level 0) of a four-year undergraduate degree course. A Foundation Year is designed to introduce you to University study in your chosen subject area.

GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CONFERMENT OF AWARDS

TheGeneral Regulations for the Conferment of Awards are a component of the University's Regulation and Credit Framework. They cover regulations that apply to the whole University provision including the University's capacity to award degrees and academic appeals.


GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES

Graduate Attributes are the qualities that the University is committed to developing in those students who engage with the opportunities available. The Graduate Attributes at Canterbury Christ Church University are being adaptable, digitally literate, effective communicator, informed, innovative, professional and self-aware.


INDIVIDUAL STUDY

Individual study is a module focussed on a student's independent work and research that is carried out under the guidance of a supervisor. An individual study follows the conventions for the academic discipline and can take the form either of a dissertation (a substantial written piece of work), or a project-based activity (e.g. a performance, artefact or project).


INTEGRATED MASTER'S [Applicable to Undergraduate students only]

Integrated Master's awards are Undergraduate awards delivered through a course (typically four years in length) that combines study at the level of a Bachelor's Degree with Honours with study at Master's level. Normally to begin the course students must meet higher entry criteria because the University will need to be assured that a student can study beyond the usual Undergraduate completion point.


INTERIM AWARD

When you do not complete your course or target award, but have completed enough credits to exit with a lower award. At Undergraduate Level this may be a , such as a Certificate of Higher Education (Cert HE), a Diploma of Higher Education (DipHE) or an Ordinary degree. For Postgraduate Taught this may be a Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert), a Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip). You cannot register for an Interim Award.

LEVEL OF STUDY [Applicable to Undergraduate students only]

A defined period of learning (typically one academic year for a full-time Undergraduate course), where you must meet specific learning criteria in order to achieve credits and progress through a course. Levels carry a specific number of credits (typically 120 credits).The period of learning and credit value may vary according to mode of study and course. Details are provided in the Course Handbook/Module Handbook and at the time of accepting your place on a course.

MARKING

Process of grading and reviewing an assessment activity and allocating marks according to set marking criteria.


MARKING PROCESS

Formal steps involved in grading and reviewing an assessment activity and allocating a mark.


MARKS

There are two types of marks you will see:

  • Mark pre-penalties and caps: this is the original mark given by the marker, and entered and displayed on the VLE. Please be aware that the mark for assessments in Blackboard is a provisional mark. If the assessment is subject to any late submission penalty or cap applied to reassessment the final mark held on your student record will be lower. All marks are provisional until they have been confirmed by a Board of Examiners.
  • Final mark: this is the mark approved by a Board of Examiner, and published on your transcript.

MODERATION

Moderation is the process by which the mark or grade of the first marker of formally assessed work is reviewed. The role of the moderator is to ensure, through sampling the first marking, that the assessment criteria have been applied accurately, fairly and equitably.


MODULE BOARD OF EXAMINERS

Formally convened bodies, comprising members of the University and one or more External Examiners that approve module marks.


MODULES

Each course consists of separate parts known as modules, which focus on specific topics and themes. Modules must be passed in order to gain credits and progress through a course and achieve an award and/or credits.


MODULE LEARNING OUTCOMES

The skills and knowledge that you will be able to demonstrate upon successful completion of a module. The module learning outcomes shape what is taught on the module and the formative and summative assessments of that module.


NON-CREDIT BEARING

Modules or awards that do not accumulate UK credit.


OPTIONAL MODULE

Optional Modules are modules a student may select as part of the credits for an award.


ORDINARY DEGREE [Applicable to Undergraduate students only]

An undergraduate degree that is awarded without honours and is therefore not classified.


OUTGOING REGULATIONS FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

These regulations apply to Undergraduate students who registered at the University before September 2017 and have continuous progression. Students who registered at the University before September 2017 and who, after September 2017, accept an offer to repeat a year or are granted an interruption of studies, will follow the Regulations for Taught Awards.

PASS/FAIL

Assessment activities that cannot be awarded a numerical mark. The assessment must achieve a pass mark.


PASS OF A MODULE

Achievement of at least the minimum standard/marks required in a module.


PASS OF AN ASSESSMENT ACTIVITY

Achievement of at least the minimum standard/marks required in an assessment activity.


PASS THRESHOLD

Pass Threshold may refer to:

  • The minimum mark needed to pass a module
  • The minimum amount of credits that you need to have passed to progress to the next level or achieve your target award

PERSONAL ACADEMIC TUTOR (PAT)

A named member of your Course Team, who meets with you regularly and acts as an advisor to your academic support needs.


PLACEMENT

See Work-Based Learning.


PLAGIARISM AND ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT

See Academic Integrity.


PRACTICE COMPETENCIES / STANDARDS

The professional and/or regulatory requirements that students are expected to master as a part of their academic course to gain professional recognition of their learning. Competencies are integrated with the academic theory component of the award and are met through facilitation of learning and assessment, which typically takes place in an employment/practice learning environment (e.g. placement). In some cases, completion of a course that meets external professional and/or regulatory requirements will enable students to apply for registration with the relevant professional and/or statutory regulatory body.


PROFESSIONAL, STATUTORY AND REGULATORY BODY (PSRB)

Professional, statutory and regulatory bodies (PSRBs) set standards for, and regulate standards of entry into, particular professions. They are a diverse group that approves, recognises or accredits higher education course.


PROGRESSION [Applicable to Undergraduate students only]

Process whereby you move through a course , progressing from one level of study to the next.


PROGRESSION AND AWARD BOARDS OF EXAMINERS (PAB)

Formally convened bodies, comprising members of the University and one or more External Examiners, that decide on your course progression and achievements.


RAW MARKS

Marks that are calculated to three decimal places and are therefore not rounded marks.


REASSESSMENT

Any further attempt at completing and passing an assessment activity. Unless otherwise stated, this will normally involve submitting an improved form of your original work or taking another examination where you will complete different questions on the same subject


REASSESSMENT WITH ATTENDANCE (RWA) [Applicable only to Undergraduate students covered by the Regulations for Taught Awards and Postgraduate Taught students registered from September 2019]

A further attempt at completing and passing assessment activities, which requires you to undertake reassessment by attending (in the following year) those modules that you have not yet passed.


RECAP

ReCap is used to record learning and teaching content, including recording lectures for you to watch again via Blackboard. Information about ReCap, and the University policy around the use of recordings, can be found on our ReCap webpage.


RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING (RPL)

The recognition of prior learning (RPL) is a process that formally recognises previous learning undertaken outside your course of study, usually before you apply. This can be through either:

  • Advanced Standing: the use of a prior certificated award to gain entry to a course at a level or stage of study later than the normal entry point;
  • Recognition of prior certificated learning (RPCL): the use of prior certificated credits to gain exemption from specific module(s) within a University course;
  • Recognition of prior experiential learning (RPEL): the use of recent previous professional or non-certificated experience to gain exemption from part of a University course.

REFERRAL (REFERRED)

Where you are granted reassessment (by a Board of Examiners) because you have not passed an assessment activity, compulsory assessment or a module and you are eligible for reassessment.


REFERRED AT FIRST ATTEMPT

The first opportunity for you to be reassessed in an assessment activity where the module pass mark has not been achieved.


REFERRED AT SECOND ATTEMPT

The second opportunity for you to be reassessed in an assessment activity where the module pass mark has not been achieved.


REGULATION AND CREDIT FRAMEWORK

The documents that set out the University regulations that govern University courses and final awards. It is made up of General Regulations for the Conferment of Awards, Regulations for Taught Awards and the Regulations for Research Awards. In addition, some courses have Special Regulations (due to Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Body (PSRB) requirements and/or employer requirements), which supplement the University’s Regulation and Credit Framework.


REGULATIONS FOR RESEARCH AWARDS [Applicable to Postgraduate Research students only]

The Regulations for Research Awards are a component of the University's Regulation and Credit Framework covering all Postgraduate Research courses. They cover a range of regulation content including, research degree organisation, entry requirements, assessment and examinations, periods of study, structure and attendance.


REGULATIONS FOR TAUGHT AWARDS

These regulations apply to you if you were a new Undergraduate or Postgraduate Taught student who registered at the University from September 2017 or if you registered at the University before September 2017 and do not have continuous progression. Students who registered at the University before September 2017 and who, after September 2017 are offered and accepted a repeat year or are granted an interruption, will follow the Regulations for Taught Awards.


REPEAT YEAR [Applicable only to Undergraduate students covered by the Outgoing Regulations and Postgraduate Taught students registered with the University prior to September 2019]

Where you do not achieve a sufficient overall pass in a level of study, and have exhausted all reassessment opportunities, a Progression and Award Board may offer you the opportunity to repeat the level or year of stud. You will not progress to the next level or achieve an award and will be required to either repeat all assessment activities in the modules for that level/year or repeat only the assessment activities for the modules that have not been passed.


ROUNDED MARKS

Marks that are calculated to the nearest whole number. A number that is 0.5 or above will be rounded up. A number that is 0.499 or below will be rounded down.

SECOND SAMPLE MARKING [from January 2021 this was replaced by Moderation]

Process whereby a second examiner ensures that the criteria for assessment and arrangements for feedback have been appropriately applied through the sampling of the work assessed by the first marker.


SEMESTER

Some of the University’s courses operate on an academic calendar consisting of two semesters per academic year. A semester refers to either of the two periods into which an academic year is divided. View the academic calendars HERE.


SPECIAL REGULATIONS

Additional or alternative regulations that enable a course to meet Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Body (PSRB) and/or employer requirements. They take precedence over the Regulation and Credit Framework. Unless the Special Regulations make specific mention of an issue, the Regulation and Credit Framework applies in full.


SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT

A formally marked assessment activity, which evaluates your learning, contributes to module credits and leads to the achievement of a final grade.


TRAIL AND PROGRESS [Applicable to Undergraduate students only]

If you do not pass a module but you are eligible for further reassessment opportunities, a Progression and Award Board may grant you the opportunity to progress to the next level of study whilst undertaking reassessment for the module that has not been passed. Conditions apply.

Some courses and awards have approved Special Regulations that do not permit trail and progress due to professional and/or employer requirements.


TRANSCRIPTS

A transcript is the formal document you will receive at the completion of your academic course. It will only include marks confirmed by the appropriate Board of Examiners. A transcript may be required by prospective employers or educational institutions to which you are applying.


TRIMESTER

Some of the University’s courses operate on an academic calendar consisting of three trimesters per academic year. A trimester refers to any of the three periods into which an academic year is divided. View the academic calendars HERE.


TURNITIN

An application within Blackboard that enables you to submit assignments digitally for marking while also providing an originality report that can be used to help you correctly reference sources of information within your work.

WORK-BASED LEARNING

Placement and/or Work-Based Learning are learning experiences located in a workplace. The activity may range from shadowing to full-time employment and it may last for a considerable period as set out in the approved course specification document.


WORK-RELATED LEARNING

Planned activity that uses the context of work to develop knowledge, skills and understanding useful in work, including learning through the experience of work, learning about work and working practices, and learning the skills for work.