Law LLB

LL.B. single honours Law: LL.B.with finance with Foundation Year 2020/21

Year of entry

An alternative approach to gaining a qualifying Law degree is to study a Law with Finance degree. This degree shares the same core Law components as the LLB Single Honours but also allows you to study another subject alongside Law to gain different insights and experience, thus allowing you to build your own career pathway.

In the Foundation Year modules include:

  • Introduction to Law
  • Contemporary Issues in Law
  • Contemporary Issues in Business
  • On successful completion of the Foundation Year, you will join Year one of the degree and modules will include Public Law, Law of Obligations and Criminal Law
  • English Legal System and Law in Society

Employment, Medical Law, Intellectual Property and Internet Law

91% for teaching quality in Law.

National Student Survey, 2017

The Foundation Year provides you with a gateway to higher education and offers you the building blocks to introduce you to your chosen subject pathway at degree level, and also introduces you to study at university. The programme is designed to support and help you to develop the self-confidence, knowledge, skills and understanding you need to prepare you for the remainder of your academic journey..

The University has recognised expertise in dispute resolution, particularly alternative dispute resolution (ADR) and specifically mediation. This is enhanced by a number of dispute resolution related modules in our curriculum and through our Mediation Clinic, the first of its kind in a UK university and in which you will have the opportunity to participate.

Our Law students have the unique opportunity in Canterbury to be involved in the administration of justice through volunteering as Community Legal Companions at the local Law courts. Our Community Legal Companions provide important assistance to an increasing number of people who attend court unrepresented. By working with partner organisations and local law firms, our Law students help court service users with a whole range of legal matters including benefit­ related issues, family breakdown and housing evictions.

We offer a comprehensive  careers and employability service , which works closely in conjunction with the Law course to provide support and guidance designed specifically for our Law students.

The University is committed to providing you with the skills you need to enhance your employability opportunities. We understand the  commitment you are making by studying with us and we will do everything we can to develop the skills employers tell us they need. We are very much an applied Law School.

We are one of only a few universities across the country which offers a dual qualification; an LLB and Membership of the National Association of Licensed Paralegals (provided you choose specific module options) which means you graduate with a GradNALP in addition to your LLB enjoying Paralegal status.

Due to our limited annual intake, we can offer a supportive pastoral care process, allowing us to take care of the individual needs of our students. We offer specialist training in areas such as writing and advocacy skills, and we will help to prepare you for the next steps in your career, for example by doing one-to-one mock interview sessions.

Our staff have been nominated for: 'Law Lecturer of the Year Award' for Inspirational Teaching in Helping Students to fulfil their Potential' LawCareers.Net 2015; 'Law Teacher of the Year Award' for 'Contribution to the Student Experience of International Students' (2013). The majority of our staff are Fellows or Senior Fellows of the Higher Education Academy.

Our staff have been nominated for: 'Law Lecturer of the Year Award' for Inspirational Teaching in Helping Students to Fulfill their Potential' LawCareers.Net 2015; 'Law Teacher of the Year Award' for 'Contribution to the Student Experience of International Students' (2013). Most of our staff are Fellows of the Higher Education Academy.

91% for teaching quality in Law.

National Student Survey, 2017

Our LLBs are designed very much with the legal services sector in mind, but we also recognise that many of our students enter other careers that utilise the skills gained on a law degree, such as teaching, social work, finance sector, business, HR etc.

Whatever your chosen career path, our Law degree ensures that you will develop skills that are valued and required by future employers and professional bodies.

“My time at Canterbury Christ Church helped me to build relationships that would sustain me throughout the strenuous ordeal of qualifying to the Bar. Even now I keep in contact with lecturers who have helped during the Bar Professional Training Course year. I think that is the most special element about Christ Church- if you seek help it is always there. The lecturers become friends and students become almost like family. I was never told that something was ever impossible- even when the statistics suggests otherwise.”

Lavinia Glover, graduated 2014, called to the Bar 2015, Pupil Barrister

We have a very active student law society that organises social events and trips throughout the year. Their mooting team has managed to reach the quarter finals of the national competition, and other students have been successful in mediation and negotiation competitions.

On the Foundation Year all students study five core modules: Contemporary Issues in Business, Management and Marketing, Contemporary Issues in Law, Individual Project, Communication and Academic Skills for HE and Personal and Career Development. These modules will introduce you to key concepts, skills and ideas in the disciplines of Business and Law by exploring key current issues and engaging you in lively debates. Having gained a grounding in each subject area you will then undertake a supervised ‘Individual Project’ investigating a topic within your chosen subject area. This module is designed to prepare you for further study at Level 4 within your chosen subject-specific degree pathway. The Foundation Year will enable you to attain all the basic transferable skills you need to undertake research, reflect on your learning, and communicate effectively in speech, writing and other formats, giving you the confidence to study in Higher Education.

When you successfully progress to the degree, modules will include 

You can study French, German, Italian, Mandarin Chinese and Spanish as part of, or alongside, your course.

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  • Public Law, Law of Obligations and Criminal Law
  • English Legal System and Law in Society
  • Employment, Medical Law, Intellectual Property and Internet Law

Your Law lecturers are committed to a responsive and proactive approach to student teaching and learning. This is underpinned by both the practical experience as well as the research and scholarship offered by the staff, some of whom are qualified practitioners, whilst others are experienced academics.

The approach to legal education at Christ Church is both traditional and progressive. This is facilitated through integrating formal directed teaching, using lectures, seminars and tutorials with indirect learning and teaching methods such as discussions, student led seminars, peer assisted learning, individual and group role-play and mooting. For example, in year one, you will typically engage in an interactive style of learning involving workbooks and computer aided assessment as part of your fundamental grounding in legal methodology.

“These kinds of studies are a great opportunity for undergraduate students to gain valuable experience of practical research into socio-legal topics which, due to the increasing popularity of alternative dispute resolution processes in the UK, are considered to be of national impo The University has recognised expertise in dispute  resolution, particularly alternative dispute resolution (ADR) and specifically mediation. This is enhanced by a number of dispute resolution related modules in our curriculum and through our Mediation Clinic, the first of its kind in a UK university and in which you will have the opportunity to participate.rtance.”

Ben Waters, former LLB Programme Director

Work experience

We have extensive links with local firms of solicitors, the local courts, Citizens Advice and other organisations through which we can help you to obtain work ­based learning in your own time. Such activities provide a valuable opportunity to develop your professional skills and make business contacts which can help greatly when looking for employment following graduation.

Research active staff members have led on research projects with the assistance of undergraduate students in the areas of staff specialism which include alternative dispute resolution, corporate law and international investment law. Examples include studies undertaken into local and regional solicitors’ attitudes to mediation and its use and opportunities for our students to contribute to published journal articles.

“The internship was an interesting and educational experience. I was able to work independently, as well as being supported within a team, to conduct a research project and produce a final report. I enhanced many skills during this opportunity as I was given a lot of responsibility in contacting participants, organising data collection and generating background research. I would recommend this opportunity to anyone who has good time management skills, enjoys networking and has a passion for research.”

Lisa Martin, Student Intern

Other information

As part of the Year 3 modules International Law and European Law, you will have the opportunity to visit a number of international courts and institutions of the EU such as the European Court of Justice, the European Parliament, the International Criminal Court or the International Court of Justice in Strasbourg, The Hague and Brussels.

As part of the module Intellectual Property Law, you have the opportunity to visit the World Intellectual Property Organization and the World Trade Organization in Geneva.

We have a very active Student Law Society that organises social events and trips throughout the year. Their mooting team has achieved success in external competitions including reaching the quarter finals of the national competition. Our students have also been successful in mediation and negotiation competitions.

Year 0 - Foundation Year

Core modules

Introduction to Law

The aims of the module are to provide students with an introduction to the study of Law and a basic grounding in its theories and concepts with an overview of legal practice and wider implications. This willenable students to understand Law both as a discipline and in its practical role within society. Practical examples are provided through case studies to support or illustrate the theory. Students will also be helped further todevelop their presentation skills by researching and delivering an individual presentation on a legal topic.

Contemporary Issues in Law

The aims of the module are to provide students with a basic understanding of contemporary issues in law. Students will be introduced to a number of contemporary issues through the perspective of different areas of legal study. Students will be able to look into a range of contemporary issues that require the application of legal rules and structures to develop their awareness of the implications and limitations of different areas of law in regards to specific issues.

Individual Project- Law

This module gives students the opportunity to investigate, under supervisory guidance, a particular topic or issue related to material covered in the subject-specific modules. A major aim of the project is to help students prepare for their chosen subject-specific study at Level 4.

Communication and Academic Skills for HE

The aim of this module is to provide and support students with the necessary skills base for engaging with Foundation Year modules, and to help students identify and develop a range of transferable skills in preparation for studying at degree level. The module aims to develop a reflective approach by helping students identify their own strengths and weaknesses, and plan for their personal, educational and career development.

Personal and Career Development

The aim of this module is to provide and support students with the necessary skills base for engaging with Foundation Year modules, and to help students identify and develop a range of transferable skills in preparation for studying at degree level. The module aims to develop a reflective approach by helping students identify their own strengths and weaknesses, and plan for their personal, educational and career development.

Contemporary Issues in Business, Management and Marketing

This module aims to prepare students for the academic study of business, management and marketing by developing a knowledge of contemporary and emerging business issues to support students’ personal, academic and professional development to prepare for work in the modern business environment. This will be achieved through addressing key questions concerning current business issues. Students will begin to put into practice the study skills that are required at university level and begin to use tools of analysis to discuss important contemporary issues. The module further aims to help students to understand the importance of issues around work and people in organisations by looking at basic HRM functions, activities and issues.

Year one

Criminal Law (20 credits)

This module aims to develop a competent knowledge and understanding of the key principles and concepts of Criminal law. Students will need to become acquainted with the basic principles and elements of criminal law and the ways in which criminal liability arises in a range of contexts. The socio-political context of criminal law will also be explored to interrogate the inter-relationships between politics and law. The course will also be situated in its criminal justice context and discrete elements of the overarching triangulation between criminal justice, criminal law and legal process will be signalled.

English Legal System (20 credits) Subject to validation*

The aims of this module are to introduce students to the theoretical and practical aspects of the English legal system, including the relationship between English law and the law of the European Union.  It aims to introduce students to the core English legal institutions and the legal system they are part of and engage students with the critical evaluation of these institutions and the legal system it is part of. This module will also introduce students to the increasing importance of alternative forms of dispute resolution, such as mediation, conciliation, and arbitration.  Throughout the module, there will be an emphasis on viewing the legal system in its broader social context, with consideration of social, political, moral, and economic issues and the way these interrelate with law. 

Law in Society (20 credits) Subject to validation*

The aims of this module are to enable students to take part in workplace-based learning through applying for and securing a placement, to gain an understanding of how law operates in wider society, both in legal practice and in the voluntary sector, and to enable students to gain a broad range of skills that will assist them in their future employment. The module will introduce students to the broader social context of law, including the work undertaken by legal professionals such as solicitors and barristers, and the role played by the third sector, such as charities and legal advice clinics.

Introduction to Obligations (20 credits) Subject to validation*

This  module will act as an introduction to the study of contract and tort and set them in the wider framework of the common law of obligations. The main aim will be to introduce students to key concepts in the separate disciplines of contract and tort. However, the module will also highlight the interplay between contract, tort and restitution in order to demonstrate the significance in practice of these distinct branches of the law of obligations.

Contract Law (20 credits)

This module aims to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the principles and structure of the law of contract. It seeks to promote a critical and reflective approach to both the theory and practice of modern contract law, and in so doing, the ability to respond critically and analytically to the complex legal arguments espoused in the case law. In light of this, the module also aims to facilitate student’s abilities to engage in problem solving through the application of case law and statute to set situations.

i. Accounting and Finance for Business 

ii. People Management in the 21st Century

Year two

Public Law 1 (20 credits) * Subject to validation

This module aims to provide an understanding of the constitution of the United Kingdom, explaining the major institutions within this system and the major constitutional doctrines governing the United Kingdom. The students are introduced to the concepts of Human and Fundamental Rights and should gain a critical understanding of the ways the laws they examine in other modules are made.

Public Law 2 (20 credits) * Subject to validation

This module aims to offer students a comprehensive understanding of the concepts and principles of administrative law.  Administrative law is the study of the control of governmental power and examines the role of legal intervention. The module therefore promotes a critical and reflective approach to both the theory and practice of modern administrative law. This enables the student to respond critically and analytically to the complex legal issues arising from regulation of administrative practice and judicial review. Thus, the module aims to facilitate student’s abilities to understand how the law regulates and facilitates administrative action.

Law of Tort (20 credits)

This module aims to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the principles and structure of the law of torts. The main aim of this module is to develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the principles and concepts underpinning the study of the law of tort, furthering their knowledge in law of Torts following the Introduction to Obligations.

Land Law (20 credits) * Name change from Property Law

The module aims to provide students with a sound and critical knowledge and understanding of the legal rules and policy governing property in England and Wales. The module aims to engage in a holistic critical discussion of the age-old problems, paradoxes and choices confronting every legal and political system in the regulation of ownership of corporeal and incorporeal things. In particular, the module will focus on the implications and issues surrounding ownership of land.

Year three

European Law (20 credits)

United Kingdom’s membership of the EU and the future of that relationship is now of the outmost importance. For the past few decades the development and application of EU law has been directly relevant to English law and the Courts. This module covers the law regulating the internal market within the EU; the free movement of persons and goods. It will help you develop and improve a highly relevant academic and practical understanding of EU law and its on-going significance

Equity and Trusts (20 credits)

This module builds upon the knowledge and understanding of Property Law gained in the second year. It adopts a critical approach to the study of equity. It aims to provide students with a sound grasp of the rules, principles and concepts relating to equity and trusts, by looking first at the historical development of principles of equity and the application of equitable remedies before moving on to consider the substantive law governing trusts.

Likely optional modules

Year 1

Financial Accounting for Professionals (20 credits)

The module provides you with an understanding of accounting with a focus on limited liability companies. It introduces you to key accounting topics. A firm understanding of double entry is established and then used to graduate to the preparation of financial statements for primate limited companies. The accounting framework is introduced and its importance to the users of accounts discussed.

Business Analysis (20 credits)

The module is designed to help you develop a range of statistical and computing skills that will be valuable to you during your academic programs and in your future career in business. Although there are no pre-requisites for this module it is assumed that you have basic mathematical skills.

Year 2

Foundations of Finance (20 credits)

The module will examine how practical techniques and tools used within a corporate setting forms part of a wider understanding of financial management. This will involve exploring the principles of financial management in maximising shareholder wealth. Its focus on the sources of finance and appraisal techniques of investment projects will be addressed first. Decisions on capital structure and management along with dividend policy are issues that students will cover as key factors in company valuation. Frequent reference to the financial crisis will be a feature of this module.

International Financial Reporting (20 credits)

International Financial Reporting (NFR) extends the scope of Financial Accounting for Professionals to more advanced topics in financial accounting. It aims to develop knowledge and skills in understanding and applying accounting standards particularly in the preparation of financial statements of entities, including groups. Understanding the theoretical framework and how to analyse and interpret financial statements are essential.

Year 3

Portfolio Management (20 credits)

This module will critically evaluate the principles of modern portfolio theory and the key components in constructing a portfolio. It will begin with the application of theory to the development of equity-based portfolios. This will then be extended by further diversification of portfolios to include other asset classes such as currency and bonds. The module will examine the role of derivatives in portfolio management and analyse different methods of active portfolio management.

Financial Management 20 credits

In addition to all our LLB degrees being Qualifying Law Degrees, we have designed our degrees in consultation with external stakeholders, such as local law practitioners as well as a range of local organisations. This ensures we help you to develop the skills which are highly valued by employers, with examples including written and verbal communication, initiative, time management, flexibility and teamwork. Many graduates use these skills to become a barrister or solicitor, but others establish careers in education, public services, HRM, management, as paralegals, chartered secretaries or in financial services. This qualification can also be used to progress on to postgraduate study in law, such as an LLM, or in related areas such as management, marketing and accountancy.

Fees

Tuition Fees for 2020/21 have not yet been finalised. Course webpages will be updated with Tuition Fee information once these have been agreed.

Additional course costs

Although we aim to minimise any additional costs to students over and above the course tuition fee, there will be some additional costs which students are expected to meet.

Costs applicable to all students

CategoryDescription
Text books Own purchase text books
Travel to other sites Where travel to other sites is required, this will be payable by the student
Library Fees and Fines Where students fail to return loaned items within the required time they will be responsible for the cost of any Library Fees and Fines applicable
Printing & Photocopying The cost of printing and photocopying undertaken by students to support their individual learning are payable by the student
Graduation ceremonies It is free for the student to attend the ceremony itself. Guest tickets and robe hire / photography are additional costs payable by the student

Course specific costs

CategoryDescription
Field Trips (including trips abroad and trips to museums, theatres, workshops etc)

The following field trips are voluntary and require an additional contribution by the student. These are typically as follows:

  • Day trip to Supreme Court in Year 1: £10 (includes travel and entrance fees)
  • Three day trip to Geneva in Year 3: £80 (includes flights and accommodation)
  • One week trip to Strasbourg, Brussels and The Hague: £150 (includes coach travel, accommodation and occasional meals)

There might be additional travel costs for taking part in competitions (mooting, negotiation, mediation etc). The Law School and the Student Law Society aim to support these activities as much as possible.

Professional Body Registration

Optional student membership to join the National Association of Licensed Paralegals (NALP), costs a one-off fee of £250 which will cover your membership during your LLB plus one further year.

Social Events

The (voluntary) annual law dinner typically requires a contribution of around £35

General principle policy

The University’s general principles policy for additional course fees are set out here

CategoryIncluded in the tuition feeAdditional cost to student
Field trips (including trips abroad and trips to museums, theatres, workshops etc) No, if the trip contributes to the course as an optional module. Yes if the trip is optional.
Travel and accommodation costs for placements  No

Travel and accommodation costs for professional placements within the Education and Health & Wellbeing Faculties.

Travel and accommodation costs for other work placements. 
Text books No Own purchase text books.
DBS / Health checks No Yes
Professional Body registration No Yes
Travel to other sites (e.g. travel to swimming pool for lessons) No Yes
Clothing / Kit Yes, where the clothing / kit is essential for Health & Safety reasons. Yes, where the clothing is kept by the student and not essential for health and safety reasons.
Learning materials Essential learning materials (excluding text books) in connection with the course. Additional materials beyond the standard provision essential for the course or where the costs are determined by the student’s area of interest and the outputs are retained by the student.
Library fees and fines No Yes
Printing and photocopying No Yes
Social events No, unless the event forms an essential part of the course. Yes, unless the event forms an essential part of the course.
Graduation ceremonies It is free for the student to attend the ceremony itself. Guest tickets and robe hire/ photography are additional costs payable by the student.

In the Foundation Year, the subject-specific modules all employ a mix of lectures, tutorials, VLE materials, and student-centred workshops / learning exercises, and use a variety of methods as their means of assessment.. This allows for a range of differentiated activities, and regular 1:1 feedback and support throughout the programme. The Individual Project allows for individual supervision and other modules make use of poster/website presentations, written essay/reports, portfolios and reflective logs as forms of assessment. In this way, the basic skills learned and developed in the subject-specific modules, are complemented with appropriate individualised support and scaffolding provided throughout. The end result of this process should be more independent, self-confident learners ready to embark on degree level study at Level 4.

During the degree, you will be taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and practical workshops. You will typically have around 10-14 contact hours per week. Your actual contact hours will depend on the option modules you select and will increase accordingly

Seminars in smaller groups will enable you to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures.  In addition, you will meet with your academic personal tutor. 

A variety of strategies that aim to foster independent, critical learning will be used in different forms, varying from module to module.

Almost all modules have lectures, alongside discussions, student-led seminars, individual and group tutorials, moots, negotiations and role plays. You will also be given the opportunity and encouraged to work in groups. There will also be a practical dimension to your learning and you will have the opportunity to attend trips to law courts both in the UK and internationally.

For levels 5 and 6, learning and teaching strategies aim to address potential gaps between theory and practice. The modules are designed to use both academic and practical approaches incorporating visits to local combined courts and chambers of Inns to complement the theoretical input of the classroom. Students on the modules International Law and European Law, for example, can benefit from the visits to a variety of European and international courts and institutions such as the European Court of Human Rights and the European Parliament in Strasbourg, the European Commission in Brussels or the International Criminal Court and the International Court of Justice in The Hague.

You will have access to the Virtual Learning Environment known as Blackboard, where you will find all the resources and guides to help with you with your learning.

All programmes are informed by the University’s Learning and Teaching Strategy 2015-2020.

Independent learning

When not attending lectures, seminars, workshops or other timetabled sessions you will continue learning through self-study.  Typically, this involves reading journal articles and books, undertaking research in the library, working on projects, and preparing for coursework assignments/examinations, workshops and seminars.

Your module tutor will direct you towards specific readings and/or activities to complete before class.

For the Dissertation in year three, you will undertake independent research. You will work under the supervision of a member of the course team. You will meet with your supervisor regularly.

Overall workload

Your overall workload typically consists of 10-14 contact hours depending on the module options you choose. You will undertake 15 hours of independent learning and assessment activity. In addition, there will be field trips and practical work involved.

For each 20-credit module, your study time should be at least 10 hours a week.

Academic input

The team consists of highly qualified academics who have a range of expertise and experience.

The majority of the team members hold doctoral and teaching qualifications and they are research-active. They have experience in delivering research-informed teaching. You can find out more about the current teaching on our Law School Staff webpage. You should note that members of the teaching team might change.

Postgraduate students sometimes assist in teaching and assessing some modules. However, experienced academics teach the vast majority of lectures and seminars.

The Foundation Year includes assignments, feedback and reflective self-evaluation. Some of this will take place during seminar or workshop sessions.

The degree provides you with opportunities to test your understanding of the subject informally before you complete the formal assessments that count towards your final mark. Some modules contain opportunities for 'formative' assessment for which you receive feedback from your tutor. Practice assessments are developmental and any grades you receive for them do not count towards your module mark.

There is a formal or 'summative' assessment at the end of each module. Assessment methods include written examinations and a range of coursework assessments such as essays, reports, portfolios, performance and presentations. The grades from formal assessments count towards your module mark.

Assessment methods are designed to help you develop the skills required by employers and for professional body purposes. These include self, peer and tutor assessment, written exercises including 'take-home' activities which are designed to replicate practice, coursework, moots (mock trials), learning portfolios, in-class activities and examinations.

 

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The balance of assessment by examination and assessment by coursework depends on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by coursework is as follows * (dependent on optional modules chosen)

Year 1

  • 40 per cent coursework 50 per cent written exams 10 per cent oral presentation

Year 2

  • 50 per cent coursework 40 per cent written exams 10 per cent practical exams

Year 3

  • 70 per cent coursework 30 per cent written exams

Feedback

You will receive feedback on all practice assessments and on formal assessments undertaken by coursework. Feedback on examination performance and summative (final) assessments is available from the module leader. Feedback is intended to help you learn and you are encouraged to discuss it with your module tutor.

We aim to provide you with feedback within 15 working days of hand-in (formal coursework assessment)

*You must achieve a pass mark of 40 and above in all Year 1 compulsory modules as a prerequisite.

Our degree programmes have been designed in order to offer you a holistic experience studying law; you will study theoretical backgrounds as well as practical aspects of Law. Your curriculum will offer you the foundations of legal knowledge required by the Bar Standards Board, to satisfy the academic component of professional training for intending barristers (Qualifying Law Degree, QLD). For applicants in  2020 who wish to pursue a career as a solicitor, our degree programmes can lead to the award of a Qualifying Law Degree, validated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority. They also establish a strong foundation for students who may wish to take the Solicitors Qualifying Examinations (SQE) in the future.

In addition to the above, LLB students can obtain the additional professional body qualification Grad. NALP, which will qualify you as a Member of the National Association of Paralegals (NALP). This will give you a head start in undertaking your LPC or BPTC or in applying for jobs.

Our Mediation Clinic provides commercial, family and workplace mediation to external parties. Through our expertise in this area, we have created opportunities for our students to experience at first hand 'real life' disputes and acquire valuable professional skills associated with a recognised method of alternative dispute resolution. Spaces are limited, though if you are particularly interested in this line of work, you are encouraged to apply for paid internships.

Students can benefit from our Mediation Clinic internships by assisting with the day to day operations of the clinic. They handle telephone and email enquiries from external parties, prepare documents and can assist with mediations where the parties have agreed to this. These funded work placements enable students to put into practice theoretical aspects of the law curriculum and enable a deeper understanding of the mediation process and how the service the clinic provides.

.

“I’m looking forward to the internship and becoming an integral part of the Mediation Clinic team. It will be great to gain a deeper insight into a process I have learned in theory and practiced in role-plays. Dealing with real clients will enhance my communication and customer service skills. The role will further increase my confidence for any future employment.”

Our LLBs have been designed with local solicitors and other organisations in mind to ensure we develop the skills employers tell us they require of graduates and to enable us to develop 'work ready' graduates.

We have extensive links with the local legal services sector which means that our teaching is informed by practice. Our modules are regularly updated to ensure that we reflect 'real life' priorities and trends so as to include socio­legal aspects within the curriculum.

“I believe that what sets law at Canterbury Christ Church University apart from the rest is its ability to provide practical opportunities that expand theoretical understanding. This combined with the small, supportive class size and dedicated and passionate lecturing team provides the perfect platform to achieve a student's potential. Christ Church is also ahead of the crowd with its novel Mediation Clinic incorporated into a university setting. Having achieved a First Class degree, I will now be completing the practical stage of training towards becoming a Solicitor."

Kyle Rogers, graduated 2014

UK/EU

Full-time study

Apply via UCAS

Part-time study

Apply directly to us

International

Full-time study

Need some help?

UK

For advice on completing your application please contact the Course Enquiry Team:

Email: courses@canterbury.ac.uk
Tel:+44 (0)1227 928000 (0)1227 928000

EU/International

Contact our International Team

 

Fact file

UCAS course code

  • MN3F Law with Finance with Foundation Year

UCAS institution code

  • C10

Length

  • 4 years full-time

    7 years part-time

Starts

  • September 2020

Entry requirements

Location

School

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Last edited: 29/05/2019 11:25:00