My Christ Church degree has opened up a whole new world and inspired me to examine my true potential as a graduate. I am now looking beyond my current role to what I can achieve personally and professionally.

Anthony, Christ Church alumnus, now Detective Investigator, Metropolitan Police

Overview

Criminology is the study of crime, criminal justice and its relationship with society; it dominates national and world news reports and is a constant feature in entertainment media.

This degree prepares you for a range of exciting career paths focusing on criminal justice and the treatment of victims and offenders. You will explore the true nature, extent and causes of crime, along with the methods used to manage crime and criminal behaviour. Our experienced teaching staff will take you through key criminological theories, applying them to your understanding of crime, the experiences of offenders and victims in the criminal justice system, and the ways in which society constructs crime problems and responds to criminal behaviour.

The varied expertise of the teaching staff allows you to explore these themes from a range of perspectives. You will also be supported by a range of criminal justice professionals and agencies, who teach on the programme and provide volunteering and networking opportunities to help prepare you for your career.

Why study Applied Criminology?

Are you aspiring to embark on a career that is interesting, exciting, varied and challenging? Are you interested in contributing to crime prevention, harm reduction and victim support? Are you interested in understanding crime, criminals, victims and criminal justice? If so, Applied Criminology may be the degree for you, as it provides an excellent pathway for a range of criminal justice career pathways. 

Through compulsory modules the Applied Criminology programme at Christ Church will cover key criminological concepts to provide you with a strong grounding in criminology. Optional modules will allow you to specialise in the areas of crime that interest you most, such as,  interpersonal violence, terrorism,  political violence, cybercrime, youth crime and gangs or social harm and mental health and crime.

Entry requirements

A typical offer would be 88-112 UCAS Tariff points.

More information about entry requirements.

88-112
UCAS Points

All about the course

The course provides a thorough grounding in core criminological themes, concepts, debates and perspectives through a range of compulsory modules and applies these theories to a range of crime problems, allowing you to see their relation to real life problems or scenarios. A range of optional modules are then offered in specialised topics related to criminology, such as mental health, media, prisons, policing and transnational and organised crime, allowing you to specialise in specific areas of interest. Sessions that focus on study skills and employability are also included as a core part of the programme, to ensure your success in study and gaining a career after graduation.

Criminology works well studied in combination with other degree programmes, as it is a rendezvous subject in which ideas from a range of disciplines are applied to the problem of crime. Students can combine Applied Criminology with a number of other subjects, including Psychology, Sociology or Business Management. Students who combine with another subject study will study 60 credits in both subjects in the 1st year and then in the 2nd and 3rd year can choose to keep this split or study 80 credits in one subject and 40 in the other to gain more flexibility. Combined Honours students will complete all core Criminology modules.

Where possible, trips or visits are offered to provide additional insight into the workings of the justice system and you will be guided in attaining relevant volunteering activities and part time work within the university and externally to improve your employability, including in prisons, the probation service, the police, victim support, and in a variety of charities. Employability is also enhanced through exposure to guest lecturers, who are experts and professionals in the field who contribute to the applied nature of the course and offer advice in gaining employment.

Work experience

We promote volunteering to our students and provide support and advice in identifying and applying for volunteering posts and work experience. We have previously developed projects where students work and volunteer with staff on research related activities, giving valuable experience and enhancing employability skills. Staff are always keen to identify and develop such opportunities where possible. All volunteering activities, whether within the University or with outside organisations, can be formally recorded and can lead to an extracurricular award.

We work closely with a number of criminal justice professionals and organisations, as well as our colleagues in policing, forensics and law, to create opportunities for our students to experience criminal justice settings. When an opportunity for a visit arises, we make it available. For example, previously students studying media and crime have visited the British Board of Film Classification in London. Occasionally there are opportunities to participate in police training events and, for several years, students have been able to spend an afternoon at a local prison as part of an optional module. During the visit students speak to both staff and inmates, as well as seeing a range of facilities within the institution. Students are encouraged to reflect on the experience afterwards, and many consider that it challenges their perceptions, as well as encouraging them to pursue a career in offender management.

A member of the teaching team is a trained coach and mentor and has injected this influence into the degree course structure to enable students to develop as people and professionals, in addition to learning the subject. It is often personal qualities such as confidence that prevents us from reaching our potential, and this approach is actively helping students to overcome issues that might impact their success.

Other information

As access to criminal justice facilities can be restricted due to security issues, we hire a range of guest lecturers to come to the University and provide sessions on their area of expertise. These lecturers are professionals who are currently working in the field and often go beyond their lecturing remit to support students in accessing information, gaining work experience or giving careers advice.

Module information

Please note that the list of optional modules and their availability may be subject to change. We continually review and where appropriate, revise the range of modules on offer to reflect changes in the subject and ensure the best student experience. 

In Year One combined honours students will take three core modules. These modules differ depending on the combining subject. They have been set to meet the learning needs of the combined honours subject and align with the specific combination. You can see the list of core modules for each combination here.

Core/optional modules

How you’ll learn

You will be taught through a combination of lectures, workshops and tutorials and you will typically have contact time of around 9 hours per week, supported by additional online materials. Your actual contact hours depend on the optional modules you select.

Key knowledge is provided through lectures, guided reading and online materials, and this is supported by class activities and discussion, which help you to apply theory to real life scenarios and problems. Some teaching is also delivered through workshops which blend knowledge delivery with discussions or activities, as well as helping with key skills development. Teaching sessions are interactive, allowing you to engage with material on a deeper level. Tutorials are available to provide one to one support. The team is dedicated to developing the whole person and therefore provide many sessions to help you develop your personal skills, as well as your academic skills.

You will have the opportunity to attend visits and trips and we support you in getting work experience.

All courses are informed by the University’s Learning and Teaching Strategy 2015-2022.

When not attending lectures, seminars, workshops or other timetabled sessions you'll have access to a range of resources to help you continue learning through self-study. This typically involves reading journal articles and books, undertaking research in the library, working on projects, and preparing for coursework assignments/examinations, workshops and seminars.

Your lecturers will direct you towards specific readings and/or activities where appropriate to complete before / after class and provide tutorials where necessary to support your learning.

We also recommend that you set up student study groups and support each other with your studies as research shows that we learn much better in communities.

A range of additional study skills and employability workshops are available within the University to help you reach your full academic and career potential.

Each 20 credit module requires approximately 200 hours of learning, of which approximately 50 hours of this is taught class contact time with the remaining being independent study.

You will study six modules per year and this is typically 1200 hours of study per year (37.5 hours per week), or approx. 12.5 hours study per module per week.  Many students choose to use holiday periods as intensive study periods, which decreases the amount of work you would do in a week. 

The teaching team have academic expertise across a range of criminological issues, including mental health, philosophy and crime, the history of crime and punishment, migration and crime, drug related crime and drug treatment, youth justice and victimology. They are also involved in research activities in these and other areas, and they bring this research expertise into their teaching. Many staff have published in these areas and have practical experience in them too.

The core team is supported by other teams in the University, such as the law, policing and forensic investigation teams, and a range of professionals  currently working in the field who provide guest lectures.

Staff use their research expertise to informs teaching, and they provide you with opportunities to be involved with research to help develop you academically and personally. Our criminology staff and students were central to a pilot of the Bystander Initiative, which aims to support students and staff to identify and prevent sexual harassment, assault and coercive behaviour. The pilot was successful, and a modified version of the initiative is now available University-wide. 

By studying Applied Criminology at Christ Church you will visit criminal justice institutions to witness how these agencies work first-hand, and enjoy a range of external lecturers from professionals working in the criminal justice field. Through this you will gain insights and knowledge on a range of professions and opportunities to gain work experience.

Donley JackProgramme Director of Applied Criminology

National Student Survey 2020

of our Applied Criminology students were satisfied with their course

How you’ll be assessed

Assessments are a core part of the programme and each module has 1-3 assessments that contribute to the 4000-word assessment quota. The course is designed to ensure that each assessment is well supported by written guides, study skills sessions, a study toolkit and staff guidance, and the course provides you with a range of assessment types to allow you to develop skills that are required in criminal justice professions. We also provide opportunities for you to gain formative feedback informally before you complete the formal assessments that count towards your final mark by providing opportunities to gain feedback on assessment plans.

There are formal or 'summative' assessments during each of the modules and assessment methods include a range of coursework assessments such as essays, reports, portfolios and oral presentations, as well as written and online examinations. In your final year you have the opportunity to undertake a dissertation in an area of your choice with close supervision from a member of academic staff. This can include conducting your own research project and offers a valuable opportunity to demonstrate that you can manage your work independently, thus helping your employability skills. The grades from formal assessments count towards your module mark and feedback is provided to ensure that you can improve future assessments.

Feedback

The team is dedicated to providing high quality feedback on all assessments to enable you to understand what action you need to take to improve your work / marks. We try to ensure that feedback is student focused and constructive. Tutorials also enable you to discuss your work.  We aim to provide you with feedback within 15 working days of hand-in for all assessments and use a range of feedback methods to meet the needs of our students.

Your future career

Through the study of this programme you will have the opportunity to gain the core knowledge and skills required for many criminal justice careers, and transferable to other related careers. Graduates of the course typically secure posts within the police, the prison service, the probation service, youth work, private companies working in security, and third sector organisations working in crime control and victim support.

Further postgraduate study is also an option and you will be encouraged to make the most of the volunteering and networking opportunities available throughout your degree course in addition to your studies in order to enhance your employability.

Just thought I'd say thanks! I can distinctly remember being an undergrad criminology student at Christ Church and thinking 'I want to publish something in the British Journal of Criminology someday' and now my first journal article is about to be published. I'll always be grateful for the wonderful teaching and enthusiasm, it really set me on my way.

ThomasGraduate in Applied Criminology with Legal Studies

Graduate Outcomes Survey 2017/18

of our Applied Criminology students were in jobs or further study 15 months after finishing their course

Combination courses

Combined UCAS Codes

Course UCAS Code Placement Year
American Studies MT97 -
Business Management MN91 L3N2
English Literature MQ93 -
Film, Radio and Television MP9H -
Forensic Investigation MF94 -
Psychology MC98 -
Religion, Philosophy and Ethics MV96 -
Sociology ML93 -
Sport and Exercise Psychology CM89 -
Sport and Exercise Science MC96 -

Combined Honours explained.

Fees

The 2020/21 annual tuition fees for this course are:

  UK / EU Overseas
Full-time £9,250 £13,000
Part-time £4,625 N/A

Tuition fees for all courses are payable on an annual basis, except where stated.

Please read the 2020/21 Tuition Fee Statement for further information regarding 2020/21 tuition fees and year on year fee increases.

Additional Information

Some of our year two and three modules have prerequisite modules, which you must have studied in a previous year. You will be advised of these when choosing options each year to ensure you make informed choices.

Professional accreditation

The Applied Criminology course adheres to and is guided by the Criminology Benchmark Statements, which define expectations as part of the UK Quality Code for Higher Education.

Industry links

We have a range of external criminal justice professionals and other experts involved in the delivery of the course. We work with them to aid course development in order to ensure our degree is current, accurate and relevant to criminal justice employers.

We actively consult and collaborate with a range of criminal justice and related organisations and these change on a yearly basis, in response to changing operational commitments of these organisations and trends in criminal justice. Collaborations include police forces, the prison service, charities and academics from other higher education institutions.

Specialist facilities

The Criminology team have access to the Canterbury Prison site as this is part of the University estate and our students are able to get involved in research and work in this area.  In addition, the staff arrange visits and trips to allow students to experience a range of criminal justice settings where operationally possible.

Apply now

Duration:

3 years

UCAS code:

M900

Location(s):

Canterbury
Apply via UCAS
Any questions?

Phone us

+44 (0)1227 928000

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