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BSc single honours Human Development (Mind, Body & Spirit) with Foundation Year 2020/21

Year of entry

The content of this course is currently being reviewed and is subject to change. Applicants will be informed of any changes that impact on the structure of the course.

A number of our degrees are also offered with an additional foundation year (Year 0). Whether you are a school-leaver or someone considering returning to study but don’t have the entry requirements for your chosen subject, a foundation year course may be just what you’re looking for.

A foundation year is the first year of a four year programme which:

  • provides an introduction not only to study at University but also to your chosen subject
  • offers you a highly supportive environment where you can develop the self-confidence, knowledge, skills and understanding for further study.

Following the Foundation Year you will go on to explore areas including:

  • lifelong learning and development
  • physical development and wellbeing
  • spiritual development
  • moral development
  • research and student academic development.

BSc Human Development (Mind, Body, Spirit) is an exciting multi-disciplinary degree course.  

It is situated within the Faculty of Education and draws on elements from existing degree routes in an innovative new combination and adds a spiritual development strand, which currently does not exist in undergraduate courses either at Christ Church or externally.

It builds towards, in particular, the MA in Myth, Cosmology and the Sacred as well as linking to the new MA in Physical Education and Physical Activity.  The new degree draws on existing strengths and expertise in a strong coherent offering. 

The course offers a range of optional modules alongside specialist modules. These modules will enable you to acquire interdisciplinary skills and concepts to help you work across a variety of disciplines.

Year 0

Entrants to level 0 BSc Human Development (Hons) (Mind Body and Spirit) with Foundation Year study core components of:

  • personal and career development
  • english, maths and science in education
  • human development
  • academic and study skills.

You will be introduced to broader concepts within education health sustainability and spirituality and research in these areas. You will also gain awareness of what human development is why we study it how we study it and how humans continue to develop.

You will explore a range of ways that human’s development through their lifespan and gain insight into physical, psychological and spiritual ideas and concepts. You will be required to consider humans, their society and how society and humans interrelate and continue to develop.

At foundation year level students take five core modules but choose a sixth optional module related to their overall programme choice (BSc Human Development (Mind Body and Spirit). These will be offered subject to cohort size. Optional module choices will be made in the second semester.

Year 1

Core Modules

Orientation to Higher Education and Research (20 credits)

This module aims to introduce students to research within the context of human development and also to orientate students to higher education. Students will be encouraged to debate, discuss and analyse the process of research and different research methodologies. Students will also explore the concepts of knowledge and truth and how these shape how we know and what we know about mind, body and the spirit.

Introduction to Psychological and Social Perspectives of Life Phases (20 credits)

The aims of the module are to introduce students to debates around lifelong human development from a psychological perspective. As such it will enable students to become familiar with theory and research related to lifelong development and well as the factors which may influence them.

Physical Development and Wellbeing (20 credits)

This module will develop students’ knowledge and understanding of physical development throughout the lifespan, including the overall development of human beings, their evolution and elements of physical, sensory and biological development, health, wellbeing and the notion of disease. Students will gain and understanding of development using the dimension of health and the interplay and relationships between the individual their environment, politics, economics, society and healthy lifestyles and disease.

Contemporary Spirituality (20 credits)

The aims of the module are to introduce students to debates around contemporary issues in spirituality.  It will enable students to familiarise themselves with some of the latest research in the field from a variety of perspectives. Students will be encouraged to examine the role spiritual assumptions and practices may play in their life.

Optional Modules

You will undertake two option modules 

You can choose one or two optional modules that are offered within the following courses: 

  • Human Development
  • Counselling, Coaching and Mentoring 
  • Early Childhood Studies 
  • Education Studies 
  • Arts in Education
  • Special Educational Needs and Inclusion Studies 

Examples Might include:

Whose Morals are They Anyway (20 credits)

The aim of the module is to introduce students to perceptions of objectivity and subjectivity with regard to morality. It will enable students to become familiar with theory, research and the factors which exert influence on moral codes.

Pedagogy Andragogy and Identity (20 credits)

The module aims to examine pedagogy, andragogy and identity.  Students will examine how we co-create, negotiate and interpret everyday worlds around us to understand human development and social beings. It will consider the multi-dimensional factors that affect learning and teaching.  The module will draw on child development, social-cultural psychology and other social sciences to study human in their complex physical and social worlds. 

Year 2

Core Modules

Exploring Research- Small Research Project (20 credits)

The module aims to provide students with knowledge of conducting a small-scale research project with or about children, young people or adults. Appropriate research methods will be introduced in addition to methodological constructs and concepts and ethical considerations within social science research.

Applied cognitive, emotional, language and social development (20 credits)

The aims of the module are to introduce students to theories and evidence which attempt to explain how humans develop cognitive, emotional, language and social skills through life, with a focus on those factors which can promote or impede development in these areas.

Physical Activity, Development and Movement (20 credits)

This module will develop knowledge and understanding of the importance of physical activity and how physical movement is developed in young children from birth throughout the lifespan.

Students will be able to recognise the importance of supporting physical development and sensory exploration across the lifespan alongside gaining an understanding of the inter-relationships between all developmental areas and will become familiar with a range of activities to promote purposeful physical activity and movement.

Critical Spirituality (20 credits)

This module will shift the focus from examples of contemporary spirituality to the way they – and religious experiences in general - have been ‘framed,’ defined and criticised by academic and non-academic discourses in the last 100 years or so. The problematic situation of spirituality in the academy with be highlighted, as well as the marginalised nature of spiritual practices in society as a whole.

Optional Modules

You will undertake two option modules 

You can choose one or two optional modules that are offered within the following courses: 

  • Human Development
  • Counselling, Coaching and Mentoring 
  • Early Childhood Studies 
  • Education Studies 
  • Arts in Education
  • Special Educational Needs and Inclusion Studies 

Examples might include:

Contemporary issues in social politics (20 credits)

The module aims to develop an understanding of the relationships between political ideology, political practice and social legislation in the UK, European and International contexts. It aims to enable students to analyse recent and contemporary issues in social policies so that they will be equipped to critically examine future policies, as well as considering the impact on society, families and community contexts.

Sustainability and the global village (20 credits)

The aim of the module is to develop students’ understanding of the phenomena ‘sustainability’ and ‘globalisation’. Students will examine contrasting views about globalisation and gain insight into its positive and negative impacts. It will enable students to become familiar with theory and research related to globalisation and sustainability, and the factors which may influence them. Students will be encouraged to take a critical perspective, evaluating the relative merits of theory and research. 

Year 3

Core Modules

Independent Study (20/40 credits)

This module aims to provide students with an opportunity to follow a reasonably sustained line of enquiry in an area of interest area related to human development and to produce a structured and relevant research project. 

By undertaking this module, students are expected to develop a critical understanding of the body of knowledge and theoretical perspectives within the area of study. This will be undertaken by engaging in the research process, analysing and evaluating theories and concepts surrounding research and their own perspectives and those of others.

Therapeutic approaches to personal development (20 credits)

The aims of the module are to introduce students to therapeutic approaches to human development. As such it will draw on a number of theoretical traditions that which have derived from clinical research as well as literature related to personal development.

Physical Activity Dilemmas (20 credits)

This module will examine and explore the current and contemporary issues of physical activity dilemmas, which for example, may include balancing personal freedom not to exercise, with costs of unfit populations.  It will consider historical and potential future physical activity dilemmas that are foreseen. It will build on the knowledge and understanding students have delivered from both physical activity and wellbeing module (level 4) and physical activity and development of movement (level 5).

Spirituality, Imagination and the Landscape (20 credits)

This module will introduce to students several important contemporary discourses and practices which link spirituality and wellbeing with the mythic imagination and the arts, with an emphasis on landscape. The module aims to encourage a creative response, requiring students to undertake a project which will be presented to their peers.

You can choose one or two optional modules that are offered within the following courses: 

  • Human Development
  • Counselling, Coaching and Mentoring 
  • Early Childhood Studies 
  • Education Studies 
  • Arts in Education
  • Special Educational Needs and Inclusion Studies 

Choice Module Examples might include

Embodying Education (20 credits)

This module introduces students to a critical and embodied understanding of ‘knowledge’ in education.  Through reflective workshops as well as embodied practices (e.g. mindfulness relaxation, yoga, martial arts and cross-curricular teaching practices) the module explores the philosophical and sociological theories of knowledge and how particular ‘rational’ forms of knowledge have taken dominance in educational settings. 

Reflective Practice: Whose ‘right’ is it anyway? (20 credits)

This module aims to support students’ critical engagement with the development and variety of human ethics and morals. Students will critically reflect on, and develop, their knowledge and understanding of approaches to morals and ethics which are embedded within a framework principally concerned with understanding the origins and implications of moral and ethical standpoints.

We continually review and where appropriate, revise the range of modules on offer to reflect changes in the subject and ensure the best student experience. We will inform applicants of any changes to the course structure before enrolment.

On successful completion of the course you will be able to progress on to Masters level with specific relevance to the MA Myth, Cosmology and the Sacred and Masters by Research Physical Education Physical Activity run by Canterbury Christ Church University.

Fees

Tuition Fees for 2020/21 have not yet been finalised. Course webpages will be updated with Tuition Fee information once these have been agreed.

Additional course costs

Although we aim to minimise any additional costs to students over and above the course tuition fee, there will be some additional costs which students are expected to meet.

Costs applicable to all students

CategoryDescription
Text books Own purchase text books
Travel to other sites Where travel to other sites is required, this will be payable by the student
Library Fees and Fines Where students fail to return loaned items within the required time they will be responsible for the cost of any Library Fees and Fines applicable
Printing & Photocopying The cost of printing and photocopying undertaken by students to support their individual learning are payable by the student
Graduation ceremonies It is free for the student to attend the ceremony itself. Guest tickets and robe hire / photography are additional costs payable by the student

General principle policy

The University’s general principles policy for additional course fees are set out here

CategoryIncluded in the tuition feeAdditional cost to student
Field trips (including trips abroad and trips to museums, theatres, workshops etc) No, if the trip contributes to the course as an optional module. Yes if the trip is optional.
Travel and accommodation costs for placements  No

Travel and accommodation costs for professional placements within the Education and Health & Wellbeing Faculties.

Travel and accommodation costs for other work placements. 
Text books No Own purchase text books.
DBS / Health checks No Yes
Professional Body registration No Yes
Travel to other sites (e.g. travel to swimming pool for lessons) No Yes
Clothing / Kit Yes, where the clothing / kit is essential for Health & Safety reasons. Yes, where the clothing is kept by the student and not essential for health and safety reasons.
Learning materials Essential learning materials (excluding text books) in connection with the course. Additional materials beyond the standard provision essential for the course or where the costs are determined by the student’s area of interest and the outputs are retained by the student.
Library fees and fines No Yes
Printing and photocopying No Yes
Social events No, unless the event forms an essential part of the course. Yes, unless the event forms an essential part of the course.
Graduation ceremonies It is free for the student to attend the ceremony itself. Guest tickets and robe hire/ photography are additional costs payable by the student.

UK/EU

Full-time study

Apply via UCAS

International

Full-time study

Need some help?

UK

For advice on completing your application please contact the Course Enquiry Team:

Email:  courses@canterbury.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0)1227 928000
Tel:+44 (0)1227 928000  (0)1227 928000

EU/International

Contact our International Team

Fact file

UCAS course code

  • B301 Human Development (Mind, Body & Spirit) with Foundation Year
  • B300 Human Development (Mind, Body & Spirit)

UCAS institution code

  • C10

Length

  • 4 years full-time including a Foundation Year

Starts

  • September 2020

Entry requirements

  • One AS Level pass or a pass in a Level 3 vocational study programme e.g. BTEC

    Candidates without formal qualifications will be considered following an interview and should demonstrate an interest in education.

    Candidates must be motivated to benefit from study at this level

Location

School

Last edited 18/05/2019 09:28:00

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Last edited: 18/05/2019 09:28:00