Staff Profile

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Dr Maria Griffiths

Senior Clinical and Academic Tutor

School: School of Psychology, Politics and Sociology

Campus: Salomons

Tel: 01227 927099

Profile summary

After an undergraduate degree at the University of Birmingham, I qualified as a clinical psychologist in 1997, having trained on the Salomons course, Canterbury Christ Church University. My career in psychology has spanned a number of NHS roles in adult mental health services, with a particular interest in working with adults given a diagnosis of psychosis, and their families. This has included a range of different service contexts, such as Assertive Outreach, Rehabilitation Inpatient Services and Early Intervention in Psychosis community teams. I'm a member of the BPS Division of Clinical Psychology, with active membership of the Psychosis and Complex Mental Health (PCMH) Faculty, the Intellectual Disabilities Faculty and the Group of Trainers in Clinical Psychology. For three years I was co-lead of the Family Interventions Network of the PCMH faculty. I'm passionate about bringing more family inclusive ways of working to routine adult mental health care, in recogntion of the central role played by social networks in peoples' recovery, as well as the impact on the well-being of relatives and friends when someone close is in distress.

I joined the Salomons programme team in 2015, as a Clinical and Academic Tutor, with responsibility for coordinating the teaching for Risk and Ethics as well as Clinical Skills (Year 1).  I continue to work part-time in an NHS role in South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, in a specialist role supporting the development of Family Interventions for Psychosis.

Research and knowledge exchange

My research interests include experiences of different family approaches, family and carer involvement, therapies for psychosis, parental mental health and multi-disciplinary clinical supervision.

I am currently supervising trainees' major research projects in the areas of: formulation and meaning-making in individual therapy for psychosis; the inclusion of children in family interventions for psychosis and mothers' experiences of being a parent with a psychosis diagnosis.

Teaching and subject expertise

I currently coordinate the programme teaching on Risk and Ethics, as well as teaching some of the topics that fall under this area. I also coordinate the teaching on Clinical Skills in the first year of the programme. My other teaching interests include family interventions for psychosis, family and carer involvement, supervision and indirect approaches for clinical psychologists in the NHS.

Publications and research outputs

Griffiths (2009) Just doing nothing: Reflections on the neglect of ‘negative symptoms’. Clinical Psychology Forum. 196. pp.32-35.

Sin, J., Livingstone, S., Griffiths, M and Gamble, C. (2014) Family intervention for psychosis: impact of training on clinicians’ attitudes, knowledge and behaviour. Psychosis, 6(2), 128-142, doi: 10.1080/17522439.2013.806569 

Taylor, R. , Mellotte, H. , Griffiths, M. , Compton, A. and Koravangattu, V. (2016) Carers matter: promoting the inclusion of families within acute inpatient settings. Journal of Psychiatric Intensive Care, 12 (2). pp. 69-77. doi:10.20299/jpi.2016.014

Griffiths, M. (2016) Book review: Parental Mental Health and Child Welfare Work: Volume 1 (Edited by Marie Diggins) The British Journal of Psychiatry, 209, 173. doi:10.1192/bjp.bp.115.180588

McGowan. J., Terry, R., @TheAgentApsley., & Griffiths, M. (2017, November, 14). Roundtable: What should we do with the Mental Health Act? Discursive of Tunbridge Wells Blog. Retrieved from https://blogs.canterbury.ac.uk/discursive/roundtable-what-should-we-do-with-the-mental-health-act/

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Last edited: 05/12/2017 03:57:00