Staff Profile

photograph

Dr Naeem Syed

Senior Lecturer

School: School of Human and Life Sciences

Campus: Canterbury

Tel: 01227 922511

Profile summary

I earned my PhD in Plant Genetics from School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham and joined Geographical and Life Science Department in January 2014. After my PhD I went for a postdoc in the department of soil and crop sciences at Texas A&M University and very recently at the University of Missouri in Columbia in USA. I have spent a considerable time as a postdoc in the Division of Plant Science at University of Dundee (based at James Hutton Institute).

Research and knowledge exchange

We are interested in understanding the epigenetic basis of alternative splicing (AS) and to what extent it contributes to transcript and proteome diversity in Arabidopsis.

Lab Members

Dr Saurabh Chaudhary (Postdoc, Epigenetics of AS)

Ibtissam Jabre (PhD student, Translational dynanics of AS)

Waqas Khokar (PhD Student, AS in diverse accession of Arabidopsis and and its role in adaptation)

Teaching and subject expertise

Level 5: Applied Plant Genetics

Level 5: Plant Control systems

Level 6: Plant responses to the environment

I think it is very useful, especially at the undergraduate level, to stimulate students by bringing into life theoretical concepts by exercises, field, and laboratory and computer sessions. This helps students to develop confidence and to understand the importance of theory and practice in solving practical problems. In addition, it stimulates discussion and active participation in classes. I believe that technical concepts must be continually accompanied by deep thinking by the students. It is then necessary to develop an educational agenda (keeping in mind the needs of different students) that allow students to develop logical thinking in pursuing their personal interests and developing a problem-solving attitude.

In summary, my teaching always respects individual capabilities/interests and I try to make topics interesting and engaging for all students in my classes. I think this helps students better understand their own strengths and weaknesses and enable them to make the best of their intrinsic capabilities and creativity in achieving different goals in their careers. 

External activities

Current Funding

£268,237 from THE Leverhulme Trust to understand the epigenetics of alternative splicing in Arabidopsis (Feb 2017- Feb 2020).

Publications and research outputs

Recent (refereed)

Syed NH, Prince SJ*,1, Mutava RN*, Patil G*, Li S, Chen W, , Valliyodan B, Joshi T, Khan S, Nguyen HT (2015) Circadian clock, SUB1 and ABAR genes mediate flooding and drought response via alternative splicing in soybean. Journal of Experimental Botany (In press, Corresponding author)

Prince SJ*,1, Joshi T*, Mutava RN*, Syed N*,3, dos Santos JVM, Patil G, Li S, Wang J, Li L, Chen W, Shannon GJ, Valliyodan B, Xu D, Nguyen HT (2015) Comparative analysis of drought-responsive transcriptome in soybean lines contrasting for canopy wilting. Plant Science (In Press, * Joint first author)

Mutava RN*, Prince SJK*, Syed NH*, Song L, Valliyodan B, WeiC and Nguyen HT (2015) Understanding Abiotic Stress Tolerance Mechanisms in Soybean: A Comparative Evaluation of Soybean response to Drought and Flooding Stress. Plant Physiology and Biochemistry. 137: 209-219. * Joint first author

Ho T, Cardle L, Xu X ,Bayer M, K.Prince SJ, Mutava RN, Marshall DF, Syed N (2014) Genome-Tagged Amplification (GTA): a PCR-based method to prepare sample-tagged amplicons from hundreds of individuals for next generation sequencing. Mol Breed. DOI 10.1007/s11032-014-0090-7

James AB, Syed N, Brown JWS and Nimmo HG (2012) Thermoplasticity in the Plant Circadian Clock : How Plants tell the Time-perature, Plant Signalling and Behaviour. 7(10):1219-23

Syed N, Kalyna M, Barta A, Marquez Y and Brown JWS (2012) Alternative Splicing in Plants – Coming of Age. Invited review, Trends in Plant Sci. 17(10):616-23

James AB, Syed NH, Marshall J, Nimmo GA, Jenkins GI, Herzyk P, Brown JWSand Nimmo HG (2012) Alternative splicing mediates responses of the plant circadian clock to temperature changes. The Plant Cell. 24:961-81 (Joint first author)

Comments on the paper in “Editors Choice” Splicing Shifts . Science 13 April 2012: 133. [DOI:10.1126/science.336.6078.133-b]

Kalyna M, Simpson C, Syed NH, et al. (2011) . Nucleic Acids Research (doi:10.1093/nar/gkr932).

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Last edited: 05/12/2017 03:57:00