Doctoral Student Profile

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Sobantu Sibanda

EdD Student

Campus: Canterbury

Completed: October, 2019

Biographical note

Sobantu Sibanda (Sox) joined CCCU as a Senior Lecturer on the Teach First ITE programme in October 2013. He was appointed Programme Director for the East of England in 2015. As Programme Director he is responsible for the operational leadership of the CCCU elements of the Teach First East of England Initial Teacher Education programme, related school-based training and school partnerships. As well as being PD Sox teaches Professional Studies and Religious Education on the Teach First ITE programme (PGCE and PGDE). He has vast experience on different school based ITE routes to teacher training, having worked with varied programmes as a school based subject and professional mentor.

Sox has also held a number teaching related roles including the following; In 2006 he attained the Advanced Skills Teacher status and this led to extensive work across Essex schools supporting CPD programmes for NQTs and colleagues in schools in challenging circumstances. He was appointed RE subject advisor for the East of England by NATRE, Subject advisor for RE for the ESSEX County Council and RE subject Advisor for CfBT leading the review of the secondary curriculum. Between 2006 and 2013 Sox was the Subject advisor for SACRE advising on the development of RE agreed syllabuses and advising schools on best practice in the teaching and learning of RE in Essex. He also co-authored the Essex Religious Studies Agreed Syllabus and over saw its implementation across the Local Authority Schools.

Project title

In Search of Social Justice: A Critical Review of Zimbabwe’s Post –Colonial ‘Education for All’ (EFA) policy

Supervisors
Clicking the supervisors' (Education) names will reveal more details about their doctoral supervision areas.

  • Professor Andrew Peterson (Chair)
  • (1st Supervisor)
    • Social Justice and Inclusion
    • Looked after children and adoption
    • Widening participation and youth at risk
    • Youth and communities on the 'margins'

    View staff profile »


  • (2nd Supervisor)
    • Intercultural Learning 
    • Study Abroad
    • International Education
    • Geography Education
    • Initial Teacher Education

    View staff profile »


Research Outline

This research adopts an Afrocentric conceptual framework of Ubuntu as its methodology in the critical analysis, interpretation and review of Zimbabwe’s Education for All policy adopted after independence in 1980. In this theoretical desktop study, I begin by developing a theory of social justice underpinned by an Ubuntu philosophy. This theory is then used as a tool in the analysis, interpretation and review of the policy documents and other related sources. The aim is to identify and interpret the policy’s social justice themes informed by Ubuntu philosophy as both a theoretical framework and methodology.

This is a ground breaking piece of research in its methodological approach and the way policy documents have been analysed and interpreted. It is hoped that its findings will help shed light on whether globalised initiatives like the ‘Education for All’ policy are relevant to the concept of social justice as expressed in different geo-political, socio- economic and cultural contexts. It is also envisaged that through the adoption of Indigenous Research Methodology this may result in more transformative research that has greater impact on the subject of the research as opposed to a mere generation of information that has no bearing on the lived experiences of the researched.

Research Outputs

Sibanda, S. ‘You’ll win nothing with kids’: Talent identification and its issues in Zimbabwean youth soccer. MSc dissertation, Brunel University 2011.

Sibanda, S. “The Quest for Unity, Peace and Stability in Zimbabwe” Departmental Seminar, 2001.

Sibanda, S. “The value of Epistemological thinking in cultivating emotional intelligence” Twenty seventh annual conference of The philosophical Society of Southern Africa, South Africa, January 28, 2000.

Sibanda, S. “Knowledge, technology are necessary but not sufficient conditions for development”  a paper presented to The Southern African Association for Culture and development studies – Knowledge and Technology Conference. University of Zimbabwe, 1998.

Teaching

Sox currently teaches on the Teach First  PGDE programme at CCCU. He has extensive experience of teaching at secondary and higher education in Zimbabwe and in the UK. With 7 years teaching experience in Zimbabwe’s secondary schools, 12 years in the English secondary education system, 5 years lecturing experience at the University of Zimbabwe and 4 years at CCCU.

Sox has also held a number teaching related roles including the following; In 2006 he attained the Advanced Skills Teacher status and this led to extensive work across Essex schools supporting CPD programmes for NQTs and colleagues in schools in challenging circumstances. He was appointed RE subject advisor for the East of England by NATRE, Subject advisor for RE for the ESSEX County Council and RE subject Advisor for CfBT leading the review of the secondary curriculum. Between 2006 and 2013 Sox was the Subject advisor for SACRE advising on the development of RE agreed syllabuses and advising schools on best practice in the teaching and learning of RE in Essex. Sox also co-authored the Essex Religious Studies Agreed Syllabus and over saw its implementation across the Local Authority Schools.

 

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Last edited: 25/02/2020 11:00:00