Fact file

UCAS code

  • B920

Length

  • 3 years full-time

Entry requirements

  • A typical offer would be BBC at A2 Level, or equivalent

Location

Department

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Occupational Therapy

BSc single honours Occupational Therapy

Occupational Therapists work with people of all ages to enable them to live meaningful lives. Our students develop an understanding of the potential people of all ages have to carry out valued daily activities and fulfil their life roles and ambitions; regardless of physical, mental or social challenges. They develop knowledge and skills to help them to plan and carry out sessions to enable those they work with to do the many things that make up everyday life such as caring for themselves and others, enjoying leisure activities and working. This may involve teaching new skills, adapting a person's environment, or looking at how they could do familiar tasks in a new way.

We believe that a person should be at the centre of all we do. Feedback from previous students confirms that the active involvement of service users and carers both in the classroom and on placement enhances learning. The staff team is committed to supporting students to undertake their studies and to develop as confident and competent therapists who can work collaboratively in a changing health and social care environment. Our Allied Health Department, which offers occupational therapy programmes, has received the highest possible rating for the quality of its provision in all areas of health provision from the Quality Assurance Agency.

The Occupational Therapy course is a pathway in the Faculty of Health and Social Care pre-registration interprofessional learning programme. This means that during the programme there is the opportunity to share learning with students from other health and social care professions and learn about how an occupational therapist works within a team of other health professionals.

The full-time programme is offered at two campuses with two intakes. Students can start in September at Canterbury or in April at our Medway Campus in Chatham Maritime. Six modules are taken in each academic year. Academic and practice knowledge are integrated throughout the course enabling students to apply the theory they have learnt in the classroom in the practice arena.

In Year 1, four occupational therapy specific modules introduce students to the core values, beliefs and theories underpinning the meaning of occupation and occupational therapy practice. Students learn about the links between health and wellbeing and occupation; the person and the contexts they live in and the human body as it functions in daily life. In addition, one module helps them to develop skills for higher learning. In this year, they carry out a seven week placement under the supervision of a qualified occupational therapist.

In Year 2, the occupational therapy specific modules focus on the skills occupational therapists need to assess, plan and carry out treatments to meet service users' needs in hospitals, schools, homes, the workplace, and residential settings. Academic skills are further developed. Students undertake one nine week practice placement this year.

In Year 3, there is an emphasis on health and wellbeing and innovation where students integrate theory, skills and knowledge. The final twelve week placement prepares them for the responsibilities of a junior occupational therapist. In this year, they also undertake an independent literature-based study in an area of professional interest.

Graduates are eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council and the qualification is recognised all over the world. Occupational Therapy is a profession that encourages life-long learning and continuing professional development. Graduates are now seeking positions not just in the NHS and Social Services but in non-traditional settings such as private companies. As a qualified Occupational Therapist, there are many opportunities including being involved in assessing individuals to return to do the things they want to do in their home after an admission; in helping a child and staff in a school to learn more effectively; or in helping an adult to return to work after a stress related illness. Newer areas of work include working with older people in residential care homes, with insurance companies getting people back into work, or in supported employment organisations assisting people with learning disabilities to join the workforce.

There is a real emphasis on the importance and meaning of occupation and how it relates to health and wellbeing. There are modern and realistic skills labs and wards that facilitate learning and help prepare for practice placements.

The Occupational Therapy programme is a pathway in the Faculty of Health and Social Care preregistration interprofessional learning programme. This means that you will have the opportunity of learning from and with a range of other health and social care students during the programme. This also prepares you for collaborative practice in the work place.

The course is modular, with six modules being taken in each academic year. Academic and practice knowledge are integrated throughout the course enabling you to apply the theory you have learnt in the classroom in the practice arena.

In the first year, four occupational therapy specific modules introduce you to the core values and beliefs underpinning the meaning of occupation and occupational therapy practice. You will learn about the links between health and well-being and occupation; the person and the contexts they live in and the human body as it functions in daily life. In addition one module will help you to develop skills for higher learning and you will be involved with students from other professional routes to explore skills that enhance working effectively together to support service users. In this first year you will have seven weeks placement under supervision of a qualified occupational therapist.

In the second year the occupational therapy specific modules focus on the skills occupational therapists need to assess, plan and carry out treatments to meet service users’ needs in hospitals, schools, homes, workplace, residential settings. You will also have an overview of the historical perspective of occupational therapy and some of the current theories used in practice. Your academic skills will be further developed examining evidence related to practice. You will continue to be involved with other students to explore team working. You will undertake one 9 week practice placement at the end of the academic year.

In year three, within the occupational therapy specific modules there is an emphasis on health and wellbeing and innovation with students integrating theory, skills and knowledge. The final 12 week placement prepares you for the responsibilities of a junior occupational therapist. The final interprofessional learning module focuses on working together within and across professional groups and services. In this year students also complete an independent literature based study in an area of professional interest.

Whilst in University, a variety of teaching methods are used throughout a student’s programme. These range from taught sessions to independent, self-directed learning. Students are involved in using PowerPoint presentations; group discussions; seminar groups; clinical skills practice; student / peer presentations; technology enhanced learning (TEL) and blended learning e.g. pre-recorded on-line lectures. Clinical skills are taught in the skills lab, a simulated and safe practice environment.

Students need to pass both the theory and the practice for every module in order to pass each year and the programme. Their understanding of theory is assessed in a variety of ways including written work in different formats, such as essays, exams, presentations and the development of online resources. Practice is assessed by their practice educator for each placement.

Applicants need to demonstrate a basic understanding of occupational therapy and show that it is a well considered career choice for them. Suitable applicants are invited into the University for an information session and interview.

Interview process: At the interview we are looking for applicants who have potential to be able to communicate and work with others, problem solving skills and a genuine interest in enabling people to succeed in their lives. It is essential that you have visited at least one occupational therapy area before interview. This can be done by contacting the Occupational Therapy Manager in hospital, social services and community settings. Some hospital occupational therapy services also hold monthly open days where they provide visitors with information about their roles and responsibilities.

Offers of a place can only be made after a successful interview, subject to satisfactory health clearance and Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check.

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