Occupational Therapy

BSc single honours Occupational Therapy 2016/17

Occupational Therapists work with people of all ages to enable them to live meaningful lives. Our students develop an understanding of the potential people of all ages have to carry out valued daily activities and fulfil their life roles and ambitions; regardless of physical, mental or social challenges. They develop knowledge and skills to help them to plan and carry out sessions to enable those they work with to do the many things that make up everyday life such as caring for themselves and others, enjoying leisure activities and working. This may involve teaching new skills, adapting a person's environment, or looking at how they could do familiar tasks in a new way.

We believe that a person should be at the centre of all we do. Feedback from previous students confirms that the active involvement of service users and carers both in the classroom and on placement enhances learning. The staff team is committed to supporting students to undertake their studies and to develop as confident and competent therapists who can work collaboratively in a changing health and social care environment. Our School of Allied Health Professions, which offers occupational therapy programmes, has received the highest possible rating for the quality of its provision in all areas of health provision from the Quality Assurance Agency.

The Occupational Therapy course is a pathway in the Faculty of Health and Social Care pre-registration interprofessional learning programme. This means that during the programme there is the opportunity to share learning with students from other health and social care professions and learn about how an occupational therapist works within a team of other health and social care professionals.

The full-time programme is offered at two campuses with two intakes. Students can start in September at Canterbury or in April at our Medway Campus in Chatham Maritime. Six modules are taken in each academic year. Academic and practice knowledge are integrated throughout the course enabling students to apply the theory they have learnt in the classroom in the practice arena.

In Year 1, four occupational therapy specific modules introduce students to the core values, beliefs and theories underpinning the meaning of occupation and occupational therapy practice. Students learn about the links between health and wellbeing and occupation; the person and the contexts they live in and the human body as it functions in daily life. In addition, one module helps them to develop skills for higher learning. In this year, they carry out a seven week placement under the supervision of a qualified occupational therapist.

In Year 2, the occupational therapy specific modules focus on the skills occupational therapists need to assess, plan and carry out treatments to meet service users' needs in hospitals, schools, homes, the workplace, and residential settings. Academic skills are further developed. Students undertake one nine week practice placement this year.

In Year 3, there is an emphasis on health and wellbeing and innovation where students integrate theory, skills and knowledge. The final twelve week placement prepares them for the responsibilities of a junior occupational therapist. In this year, they also undertake an independent literature-based study in an area of professional interest.

Graduates are eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council and the qualification is recognised all over the world. Occupational Therapy is a profession that encourages life-long learning and continuing professional development. Graduates are now seeking positions not just in the NHS and Social Services but in non-traditional settings such as private companies. As a qualified Occupational Therapist, there are many opportunities including being involved in assessing individuals to return to do the things they want to do in their home after an admission; in helping a child and staff in a school to learn more effectively; or in helping an adult to return to work after a stress related illness. Newer areas of work include working with older people in residential care homes, with insurance companies getting people back into work, or in supported employment organisations assisting people with learning disabilities to join the workforce.

There is a real emphasis on the importance and meaning of occupation and how it relates to health and wellbeing. There are modern and realistic Simulation Suites that facilitate learning and help prepare for practice placements.

The Occupational Therapy programme is a pathway in the Faculty of Health and Social Care preregistration interprofessional learning programme. This means that you will have the opportunity of learning from and with a range of other health and social care students during the programme. This also prepares you for collaborative practice in the work place.

The course is modular, with six modules being taken in each academic year. Academic and practice knowledge are integrated throughout the course enabling you to apply the theory you have learnt in the classroom in the practice arena.

In the first year, four occupational therapy specific modules introduce you to the core values and beliefs underpinning the meaning of occupation and occupational therapy practice. You will learn about the links between health and well-being and occupation; the person and the contexts they live in and the human body as it functions in daily life. In addition one module will help you to develop skills for higher learning and you will be involved with students from other professional routes to explore skills that enhance working effectively together to support service users. In this first year you will have seven weeks placement under supervision of a qualified occupational therapist.

In the second year the occupational therapy specific modules focus on the skills occupational therapists need to assess, plan and carry out treatments to meet service users’ needs in hospitals, schools, homes, workplace, residential settings. You will also have an overview of the historical perspective of occupational therapy and some of the current theories used in practice. Your academic skills will be further developed examining evidence related to practice. You will continue to be involved with other students to explore team working. You will undertake one 9 week practice placement at the end of the academic year.

In year three, within the occupational therapy specific modules there is an emphasis on health and wellbeing and innovation with students integrating theory, skills and knowledge. The final 12 week placement prepares you for the responsibilities of a junior occupational therapist. The final interprofessional learning module focuses on working together within and across professional groups and services. In this year students also complete an independent literature based study in an area of professional interest.

Whilst in University, a variety of teaching methods are used throughout a student’s programme. These range from taught sessions to independent, self-directed learning. Students are involved in using PowerPoint presentations; group discussions; seminar groups; skills practice; student / peer presentations; technology enhanced learning (TEL) and blended learning e.g. pre-recorded on-line lectures. Skills are taught in the Simulation Suite, a safe place to practice.

Students need to pass both the theory and the practice for every module in order to pass each year and the programme. Their understanding of theory is assessed in a variety of ways including written work in different formats, such as essays, exams, presentations and the development of online resources. Practice is assessed by their practice educator for each placement.

Recruitment for this course considers not only the values of the specific profession you are wishing to join, but also the values of the wider NHS. You can expect to be shortlisted and interviewed based upon these values as well as course/profession specific requirements.  More information on values can be found here.

Applicants need to demonstrate a basic understanding of occupational therapy and show that it is a well considered career choice for them. Suitable applicants are invited into the University for an information session and interview.

Interview process: At the interview we are looking for applicants who have potential to be able to communicate and work with others, problem solving skills and a genuine interest in enabling people to succeed in their lives. It is essential that you have visited at least one occupational therapy area before interview. This can be done by contacting the Occupational Therapy Manager in hospital, social services and community settings. Some hospital occupational therapy services also hold monthly open days where they provide visitors with information about their roles and responsibilities.

Offers of a place can only be made after a successful interview, subject to satisfactory health clearance and Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check.

Fees

2015/16 and 2016/17

All places on this course for entry in academic years 2015/16 and 2016/17 are NHS bursary funded for Home and EU students only.

There are no tuition fees payable and you may be eligible for a maintenance bursary:

2017/18

We recognise that in the Government’s Spending Review, on 25 November 2015, changes are going to be made to the funding for nursing, midwifery and allied health professions pre-registration education for the academic year 2017/18.

Full details are to be confirmed by the Government and we will update our web pages as information becomes available.

The current information detailed in the Government’s Department of Health NHS Bursary Reform Paper issued on 9th December states that:

  • From 1st August 2017 new nursing, midwifery and allied health students will no longer receive NHS bursaries. Instead, they will have access to the same student loans system as other students.
  • Under the loans system, students on nursing, midwifery and allied health courses will receive around a 25% increase in the financial support available to them for living costs. The precise change for individuals will be dependent on their circumstances – for example, where they study, the length of the course, income and residency.
  • The Department of Health intends that students studying nursing, midwifery and the allied health subjects as a second degree will also be able to get student loans.
  • Repayment terms are expected to be the same as for students on the standard loans system. Graduates become eligible to pay back their loans in the April after they graduate, and then they will have to pay back only 9% of their earnings over £21,000 per year. For example a graduate on a salary of £21,700 per year would pay £5.25 per month. If income drops below £21,000 for any reason, for example part-time working or a career break, repayments stop. Any outstanding balance on student loans is written off by the government 30 years after the graduate becomes eligible for repayment (in the April after graduation).

The Council of Deans of Health has also issued some background information for students. View the website for further details.

The Government has not announced any changes to funding for students applying to study in academic years 2015/16 and 2016/17.

Additional course costs

Although we aim to minimise any additional costs to students over and above the course tuition fee, there will be some additional costs which students on courses are expected to meet. 

  • Students on this programme may incur travel and accommodation costs whilst on placement. These costs can be reclaimed by students from the NHSBSA.
  • Students on this programme will also be required to wear uniform in practice whilst on placement. The cost of the uniform is funded by the NHS.  

Read further information about the general additional costs which apply to courses at Canterbury Christ Church University. 

Fact file

UCAS code

  • B920

Length

  • 3 years full-time

Starts

  • September 2016 (Canterbury)

    April 2017 (Medway)

    Please note: April 2017 is the final April intake. From September 2017, all future intakes will be September only.

Entry requirements

  • A typical offer would be BBC at A2 Level, or equivalent
    GCSE English Language and Mathematics, at grade C or above, or equivalent.
    More entry requirement details.

Location

School

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Last edited: 30/06/2016 21:50:00