elc-570

BA single honours  English Language and Communication with Foundation Year 2018/19

Year of entry

A number of our degrees are also offered with an additional foundation year (Year 0). Whether you are a school-leaver or someone considering returning to study but don’t have the entry requirements for your chosen subject, a foundation year course may be just what you’re looking for.

A foundation year is the first year of a four year programme which:

  • provides an introduction not only to study at University but also to your chosen subject
  • offers you a highly supportive environment where you can develop the self-confidence, knowledge, skills and understanding for further study.

Following the Foundation Year you will go on to explore areas including:

  • how language works
  • how people communicate
  • how people use, learn and teach English
  • how people from different cultures communicate successfully

95% of our most recent English Language and Communication students were in jobs or further study 6 months after finishing their course.

2015-16 DLHE

Communication underpins how we, as human beings, function and operate in just about every area of our lives − the appropriate use of language and communication is the basis for success in virtually every domain of human activity, from politics, to business, to all areas of work, even to personal and family life.

This course offers you the tools to understand the many complex and fascinating ways in which language and communication work in the world, and also to improve your own abilities and skills in communication and daily discourse.

The aim of the English Language and Communication degree is to allow you to develop an in-depth understanding of the English language and its role in the world, as well as an in-depth understanding of communication in terms of how it functions at interpersonal, public, group and intercultural levels.

The English language is the dominant language of international communication and with increasing globalisation, it is important to have a refined understanding of the nature and structure of English and how we communicate with each other. An understanding of the various dimensions of language and communication will give you the ability to communicate more effectively in this complex, globalised world.

Top reasons to choose this course

  • Focus on how language and communication can be applied to the real world
  • The opportunity to do a work placement, carrying out a project in a work setting related to English Language and Communication
  • Unlike other University courses, we focus on English Language and Communication equally. Our teaching staff are experts in language, communication and the interface between the two

“The course has provided me with many transferable skills that I am now using within my PGCE course. All staff members were extremely supportive and highly professional. I would definitely recommend this course, for its variety, depth and structure.”

Imogen Burrage (former student)

You can study French, German, Italian, Mandarin Chinese and Spanish as part of, or alongside, your course.

more info

You will study a range of modules focusing either on language or communication (although there is a great deal of crossover between the modules). You will develop both your ability to understand language and communication, as well as the ability to investigate these areas. In each year, you will study a range of compulsory modules that cover the key concepts and ideas in language and communication. As you progress into the second and third years, you will have the opportunity to study optional modules that focus either on professional applications of language and communication, or on areas with a more traditional academic focus. Options offered in the second and third years have included how to teach English as a foreign language, international business communication as well as an option on the history of the English language.

Work experience

You can gain work experience by doing the English language in the workplace module. Previous students have done range of placements in business and education. For example, one student did her placement in a hotel and was given the job to develop its online promotion and marketing.

We were one of the first universities in the country to offer English Language and Communication as a degree programme.

Research seminars

The School of Language and Applied Linguistics have an annual programme of research seminars which English Language and Communication students can attend.

Foundation Year Zero

Students on all of the  Faculty of Arts and Humanities Foundation Year courses will undertake 80 credits of generic core modules introducing them to study in the arts and humanities and university level skills, namely:

  • Academic Writing and Study Skills
  • Personal and Career Development
  • Understanding Arts and Humanities
  • Being Human: an Introduction to the Humanities

In addition you will be offered two 20 credit optional modules, one to be studied in each semester. The full list of optional modules is as follows and you will be placed onto the modules which most effectively complement your degree pathway choice and, where applicable, your study interests:

  • Dangerous Ideas
  • Foundation English Language and Communication
  • Foundation English Literature
  • Foundation Media and Communications
  • Analysing British Cinema
  • Historical Foundations
  • America and the World (subject to validation)
  • Music and Performing Arts in Context
  • The Languages and Theory of Music

Optional Modules associated with Degree Pathway in Semester 1 (S1) and Semester 2 (S2)

  • Foundation English Literature S1
  • Foundation English Language and Communication S2

Core modules

Year 1

Introduction to ELC in Higher Education

This module is your introduction to studying English Language and Communication at university level. It will provide you with the skills and knowledge required for you to have success in learning (e.g. in lectures, seminars and tutorials) and in assessment (e.g. assignments, presentations and examinations) while also providing you with an overall introduction to the subject. This module will involve both classroom work and work with your personal tutor.

Exploring Language

The aims of the module are for you to develop an understanding of the nature of language and the expression of meaning, and of how the resources of grammar, lexis and phonology are used in language in general and in English in particular to convey meaning in different kinds of written and spoken texts. It also aims for you to develop skills of linguistic critique, analysis of texts and phonemic transcription.

Group Communication

The aims of this module are to provide you with an understanding of the key factors in group communication, and to enable you to apply this understanding in exploring communication among different social, family, and work-based groups.

The Roots and Routes of English (Single Honours only)

In this module, your awareness and knowledge of variation, diversity and change in language, with reference to regional variation in the UK at the present time, to diversity in present-day channels of communication, and also to changes in language over time will be raised. In doing so, you will be introduced to the history of the English language from Anglo-Saxon to the present day.

Language and Communication in Context (Single Honours only)

This module develops and builds on your understanding of grammar, lexis and phonology from Exploring Language and your knowledge of verbal and non-verbal communication from Exploring Communication by studying work and areas of research in which knowledge of these linguistic and communication systems are put to regular, practical use. It also aims to give you a sense of the wide range of activities underpinned by expertise in language and communication analysis.

Contemporary Language Studies: (French, Spanish, German, Italian or Mandarin Chinese. Single Honours only)

have success in learning (e.g. in lectures, seminars and tutorials) and in assessment (e.g. assignments, presentations and examinations) while also providing you with an overall introduction to the subject. This module will involve both classroom work and work with your personal tutor.

English Language: Present, Past and Future (Single Honours only)

In this module, your awareness and knowledge of variation, diversity and change in language, with reference to regional variation in the UK at the present time, to diversity in present-day channels of communication, and also to changes in language over time will be raised. In doing so, you will be introduced to the history of the English language from Anglo-Saxon to the present day.

Year 2

Discourse, Text and Genre

By doing this module, you will get an understanding of the essential nature and principles of discourse studies and the ways in which discourse, genre and text are influenced by contextual factors and pragmatic intention. This module will raise your awareness of how different text types and genres form a variety of domains, and the ways in which generic features are affected by the functions of different genres. You will also develop an awareness of structural, vocabulary and phonological resources in English and their effect on meaning and communication through discourse, and your ability to identify and critique structural and vocabulary features in texts as they impact on meaning and affect successful communication.

Intercultural Communication 1

The module aims to provide you with an understanding of how cultural identity influences how individuals express themselves, both verbally and non-verbally, and of what it means to be ‘interculturally communicatively competent’, in other words, to be skilled at communicating with people from and in a variety of cultural contexts. From this, you will develop an understanding of the various factors involved when people from different cultures communicate.

Language Acquisition (optional for combined honours)

The processes involved in the acquisition of language can tell us much about the nature of language itself as a system of human communication. We have all acquired our own mother-tongue as children with apparent effortlessness, yet how this remarkable achievement happens remains a subject of scholarly fascination and controversy. In addition, many of us go on to learn more than one other additional language at school or later in life, but with much greater individual variation in both effort and success. This module aims to provide you with an understanding of the processes involved in learning a first language, as a child, and any subsequent language in later life. It will explore the main theories put forward to explain the phenomena, with reference to the internal and external factors involved.

Investigating Language and Communication (optional for combined honours)

The aim of this module is twofold: firstly, to provide you with an understanding of research methods used in the study of language and communication; and secondly, to apply this knowledge in carrying out a small-scale investigation of language and communication. This module, then, is a very useful preparation for the individual study in the third year.

Year 3

Language and Society

Studying this module gives you an insight into the ways in which language and society interact, in what is termed the study of sociolinguistics. This area of study concerns itself with variation, be it geographical variation related, say, to accent and dialect, or to variation related to age or to gender, or historical variation related to language change, revival or death. You will therefore study the phenomena of variation in language as related to society, looking at the factors which lie behind variation and the ways in which variation occurs. You also look at ways in which linguistic variation can be studied, thereby enhancing your ability to investigate language variation for yourself.

Intercultural Communication 2

In this module you will explore how intercultural communication functions in practice; that is to say, how communication succeeds and fails between people from differing cultural and language backgrounds. You will examine this from two perspectives: how people are culturally represented; and how people’s messages can be misinterpreted in interpersonal communication. The aim is thus for you to understand the theory that underlies communication success and failure, and for you to have a critical understanding of how this manifests itself in various social settings.

Individual Study - 40 credits (option for Combined Honours)

The aims of this module are to enable you, under the guidance of a tutor, to undertake a piece of focussed investigation, and to build on work done in previous years by undertaking further study of one aspect of those subjects, or to enable exploration of a new area, provided that sufficient skills have been acquired and that the project is deemed viable. It also aims to provide an opportunity for you to develop your research and analytical skills and combine disciplined and sustained academic study with personal interest.

Likely optional modules

Year 2

Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL 1)

This one of the most popular optional modules. It aims to provide you with an understanding of the key principles underlying the practice of communicative English language teaching to adults. It provides an understanding of core concepts of English grammar, lexis and phonology in relation to TEFL, and also offers an insight into the teaching of the four language skills – listening, reading, writing and speaking. Finally, it provides an introduction to the practical classroom teaching skills required by teachers of English to speakers of other languages.

Business Communication

This module aims to place your developing knowledge of communication in English into a specific and tangible working domain – that of businesses and organisations. The ability to assess the kinds of communication that are required in companies and businesses will be focussed upon, analysed and investigated. An understanding of business communications, both those that are internal to an organisation as well as those that are external to it, will be the particular focus of the module.

Old English

This module will introduce you to the study of Old English literature and language. You will learn the language skills necessary to translate and analyse poetry and prose written in Old English, and develop an understanding of the literary, cultural, and historical contexts in which this language and its literature were produced. A range of texts will be translated and studied in Old English, including religious and literary texts (in prose and poetry) from the Anglo-Saxon era, alongside other works which are now important historical sources for understanding the period.

Technology Mediated Communication

The aim of this module is to develop your understanding of technology-mediated communication. Technology-mediated communication has become a major means of communication in both professional and personal spheres of life. Therefore, a good level of fluency and competence (digital literacy) in technology-mediated communication is becoming pre-requisite for successful communicators in today’s world. You will look at why and how a range of key technology-mediated communication tools are being used within the gamut of daily life.

Contemporary Language Studies (French, Spanish, German, Italian, Mandarin Chinese)

For single honours students, it is possible to continue the foreign language you studied in the first year at a higher level. The aim of this module is to build on the language competence you acquired in the first year and expand knowledge and practical skills in the use of that language in an international work context; to contextualise the learning of the language through a study of relevant aspects of the economic, topical and global issues in the countries where the language is spoken.

Year 3

Teaching English as a Foreign Language 2 (TEFL 2)

This module can only be taken by those who studied TEFL1 in the second year. It aims to provide you with an understanding of the key principles and good practice of a variety of different methods and approaches utilised in the teaching of English to speakers of other languages, extending the work done on the TEFL1 module. This module enables you to develop a critical awareness of the value and role of these different methods in different contexts. It also introduces you to a range of learning styles present in a language classroom. In terms of language awareness the module provides an extended insight into the core systems of English (grammar, lexis and phonology) in relation to TEFL and, finally, it provides an enhanced understanding of key classroom techniques required by teachers of English to speakers of other languages.

Intercultural Training

The module complements the work carried out by you in the Intercultural Communication modules. It provides you with both the knowledge of approaches to intercultural training and the practical techniques to implement programmes of intercultural training in a variety of social and professional contexts, including local communities, educational institutions, business environments, social services, the police and health care. In meeting these overall aims, the module is designed to provide you with an informed understanding of why and how intercultural conflict occurs, and the place of intercultural training in conflict avoidance and resolution.

English Language and Communication in the Workplace

In this module you carry out a work placement. You are required to find a work placement and, once you have carried out your placement, submit and present a portfolio. This will help you develop the skills, abilities and knowledge to prepare for employment within professions that require knowledge and skills in English language and communication; to gain knowledge and skills of the workplace; and to enable you to apply English language and communication theory and practice in an authentic workplace environment. This will extend your academic and professional understanding as well as providing you with an invaluable means to gain future employment.

Language and Gender

This module will help you to develop your critical understanding of the relationship between gender and language use. You will explore the relationship between language and gender by examining the way language reveals, sustains and influences attitudes to gender and the different ways in which speakers’ use of language reflects their gender identity. This includes differences in styles of communication in speech, writing and computer-mediated communication and looks at both verbal and non-verbal communication.

International Business Communication

In order to do this module, you will have studied Business Communication in the second year. This is a module for you if you wish to develop your understanding of business communication in international and multicultural contexts. The module aims to aid you in the development of intercultural skills, critical analytical ability and cultural self-awareness. Key to this is seen to be the development of an understanding of strategies to operate in diverse business communication environments. The module will help you develop the necessary knowledge, understanding and analytical ability to approach communicating effectively in global business environments.

Individual Study - 20 credits (Option for Combined Honours only)

This module is designed for those combined honours students who wish to carry out a smaller individual study. As with the 40 credit version, it will enable you, under guidance of a tutor, to undertake a piece of focussed investigation, and to build on work done in previous years by undertaking further study of one aspect of those subjects or to enable exploration of a new area, provided that sufficient skills have been acquired and that the project is deemed viable. It also aims to provide opportunity for you to develop your research and analytical skills and combine disciplined and sustained academic study with developed personal interest.

Contemporary Language Studies (French, Spanish, German, Italian, Mandarin Chinese)

For single honours students, it is possible to continue the foreign language you studied in the first and second year at a higher level. The aims of the module are to equip you with a level of fluency and accuracy in the foreign language enabling you to function comfortably in both social and work situations and to remove any language barrier within those situations; to make you conversant with the general and work cultures of countries where the language is used.

The analytical and communication abilities that an English Language and Communication degree provides are called ‘transferable skills’ and are considered desirable in almost any occupation.

Because of its flexibility, this degree lets you choose from many different employment sectors and occupations. Teaching and social work are common career destinations; working in communication training is another. A large number of graduates choose to work in a creative field, like journalism, advertising, PR or marketing. There are also many opportunities for further study and academic work.

"Studying ELC at Christ Church was a great experience which was considerably enhanced by the supportive lecturers and fascinating seminars. Being an ELC student has equipped me with the skills to continue my studies at Masters level."

Deanna Demetriou PhD student at Canterbury Christ Church University

Composition of the course

For a typical taught module, you will expect 50 hours’ contact time in the form of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Furthermore, in order for you to succeed in the course, you will need to carry out an additional 200 hours practice learning and independent study for each module. This normally involves reading, note-taking, organisation, working on assessments and so forth. In the third year, the ‘Individual Study’ and ‘English Language and Communication in the Workplace’ are structured differently with far more independent learning and the majority contact being through individual tutorials with your tutor.

Lectures are at the basis of delivery of many of the modules as a means to introduce subject knowledge and theory. However, there is very much an emphasis on these being participatory and interactive events allowing you to engage with the lecturer on the knowledge being transmitted. Seminars also play a key role in the majority of modules. They are not just a space in which to discuss the knowledge presented in lectures and in your reading, but they are also spaces in which you can participate in case studies, tasks and workshops that either examine examples of language and communication or apply English language and communication theory, knowledge and skills to solve problems. Furthermore, seminars are also a space in which you can carry out experiential tasks where you reflect on your own language use and communication behaviour. Tutorials are of key importance whether individual or group. They are used to discuss assessments; to discuss module content; and to discuss issues related to study skills and graduate skills.

Academic input

There are currently eleven full-time and two part-time members staff who teach on English Language and Communication. In terms of their position, there are currently three principal lecturers and eight senior lecturers, one sessional lecturer and one PhD student. We also have a dedicated programme administrator. The team bring together a wide range of interesting experience in terms of teaching around the world; international education project work; and research.

The majority of modules offer more than one type of assessment being either a mixture of coursework and examination, or just coursework. With coursework, there is a range of assessments that includes more than the traditional essay and assignment. For many assessments, students collect authentic samples of language and communication for analysis and interpretation. Portfolios are a means of assessment in those modules concerned with the practical application of language and communication. Presentations occur in many modules. Finally, with examinations, they are not just restricted to the traditional essay question, but are concerned with the analysis of examples of language and communication as well as problem solving of case studies using English language and communication theory, knowledge and skills.

We are currently working with Migrant Help in Dover to provide work placements for students.

Tuition Fees for 2018/19 have not yet been finalised - please read the 2018/19 Tuition Fee Statement for further information regarding 2018/19 tuition fees and year on year fee increases.

Fees

Additional course costs

Although we aim to minimise any additional costs to students over and above the course tuition fee, there will be some additional costs which students are expected to meet.

Costs applicable to all students

CategoryDescription
Text books Own purchase text books
Travel to other sites Where travel to other sites is required, this will be payable by the student
Library Fees and Fines Where students fail to return loaned items within the required time they will be responsible for the cost of any Library Fees and Fines applicable
Printing & Photocopying The cost of printing and photocopying undertaken by students to support their individual learning are payable by the student
Graduation ceremonies It is free for the student to attend the ceremony itself. Guest tickets and robe hire / photography are additional costs payable by the student

General principle policy

The University’s general principles policy for additional course fees are set out here

CategoryIncluded in the tuition feeAdditional cost to student
Field trips (including trips abroad and trips to museums, theatres, workshops etc) Yes, if the trip contributes to the course (whether it is part of an optional or compulsory module), but not including food and drink. Yes, if the trip is not an essential part of the course but is offered as an enhancement or enrichment activity, or for a student’s personal development.
Travel and accommodation costs for placements  No

Travel and accommodation costs for professional placements within the Education and Health & Wellbeing Faculties.

Travel and accommodation costs for other work placements. 
Text books No Own purchase text books.
DBS / Health checks No Yes
Professional Body registration No Yes
Travel to other sites (e.g. travel to swimming pool for lessons) No Yes
Clothing / Kit Yes, where the clothing / kit is essential for Health & Safety reasons. Yes, where the clothing is kept by the student and not essential for health and safety reasons.
Learning materials Essential learning materials (excluding text books) in connection with the course. Additional materials beyond the standard provision essential for the course or where the costs are determined by the student’s area of interest and the outputs are retained by the student.
Library fees and fines No Yes
Printing and photocopying No Yes
Social events No, unless the event forms an essential part of the course. Yes, unless the event forms an essential part of the course.
Graduation ceremonies It is free for the student to attend the ceremony itself. Guest tickets and robe hire/ photography are additional costs payable by the student.

UK/EU

Full-time study

Apply via UCAS

Need some help?

For advice on completing your application please contact the Admissions Enquiry Team:

Email: admissions@canterbury.ac.uk
Tel:+44 (0)1227 782900

Fact file

UCAS code

  • Q313 English Language and Communication with Foundation Year

Institutional code

  • C10

Length

  • 4 years full-time

Starts

  • September 2018

Entry requirements

  • Candidates should have studied at level 3 and have attained 48 UCAS Tariff points, although those without formal qualifications will be considered.

    You do not need to have significant prior knowledge of Arts and Humanities related subjects but should be motivated to study the subject.

Location

School

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Last edited: 19/09/2017 10:47:00