Diagnostic Radiography

BSc single honours Diagnostic Radiography 2016/17

Effective health and social care services depend on the professional knowledge and expert skill of their practitioners. Radiographers providing this care require the highest levels of professional knowledge and competence and mature confidence in their expertise. Diagnostic Radiographers work mainly within radiology departments in NHS hospitals or in private hospitals and clinics.

The role of a diagnostic radiographer involves interacting with patients and making them feel relaxed and at ease while conducting technical clinical examination procedures.

Radiology departments within hospitals normally provide a wide range of different imaging investigations e.g. ultrasound, conventional and digital x-ray examinations, nuclear medicine, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography.

The Diagnostic Radiography programme at Canterbury Christ Church University has been designed to provide an educational environment that supports, encourages and guides students to achieving the practice and personal skills necessary to work as a member of the diagnostic imaging services and the wider health care team.

Additionally, the programme provides significant opportunities to learn together with students following other health and social care programmes. Students on this programme gain clinical and academic knowledge through an integrated programme delivered within the Department’s dedicated practical and laboratory facilities and in Clinical Radiology Departments in Kent and East Sussex.

The programme is modular with six modules being taken in each academic year. The students study four radiography specific modules each year; these are The Human Body, Radiation Science, Radiographic Practice and Image Interpretation. Within these themed modules, the level of knowledge and complexity will increase year on year.

Clinical education and clinical practice are pivotal to the Diagnostic Radiography programme. Approximately 50% of learning occurs within the clinical setting as structured workplace learning activities reinforced by a theoretical context developed during periods of academic study. Clinical placements are arranged at a number of sites within the south east region.

The programme uses a wide range of assessment strategies which support and develop the process of clinical and academic learning. Assessment activities include research-based assignments, objective structured examinations, clinical and written examinations, oral presentations, case studies, and poster presentations. The assessment strategy seeks to reinforce the links between theory and practice and provides opportunities for students to integrate their development across all areas of practice in Radiography.

The Diagnostic Radiography programme has been designed to ensure graduating practitioners have the professional, educational and personal skills necessary to meet the demands of the present and the challenges of the future. Graduates from this programme are eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and will normally begin their careers in the National Health Service.

An integral part of the Diagnostic Radiography programme is the development of sound research skills that encourage and enable practitioners to evaluate and improve professional practice throughout their career. These research skills equip our graduates to go on to undertake a higher taught or research degree at the University or elsewhere. It is normal, two or three years after qualification, for a Radiographer to choose a speciality in which they wish to advance and it is common to apply for a specialist training post and return to university part-time for further study at Masters or Doctoral level.

Radiographers with experience are much valued in the international market and opportunities in sales, research and development are also available in the imaging and healthcare industries.

The programme integrates theory and clinical learning to develop a series of modules that have as a central theme the dimensions of professional practice set against an interprofessional experience. In combining the two, students gain an essential understanding of client centred care, based on the assessment of need and provision of holistic care.

The course is modular with six modules being taken at each academic level. The students study four radiography specific modules each year; these are:

  • The Human Body
  • Radiation Science
  • Radiographic Practice
  • Image Interpretation

Within these themed modules the level of knowledge and complexity will increase year on year.

At the end of the first year the student will have learnt the fundamental aspects of general x-ray examinations and the concepts of professionalism. Topics will include healthcare ethics, safe effective practice, communication and patient care, including the social and psychological factors relating to health and wellbeing. In year two radiographic practice and technique for fluoroscopy and mobile examinations is considered in conjunction with the impact on the service user undergoing these examinations. By the end of year three students will be able to develop and critically evaluate the principles of good radiographic practice with service users and carers while demonstrating sensitivity to particular needs and being able to place this practice within the context of professional autonomy. In addition to the profession specific modules the student will also study two modules each year in conjunction with all the students undertaking professional programmes in health and social care. These modules are centred on the values that we share rather than specific elements of knowledge.

In year one the focus will be on professional values, beliefs and behaviours. The second year challenges the professional stereotyping in health and social care and explores the concepts of collaboration and team working in health and social care. In year three these concepts are extended to encompass complex situations and how professional practice is developed and maintained.

Clinical Education and Practice

Clinical education and clinical practice are pivotal to the Diagnostic Radiography programme. Approximately 50% of learning occurs within the clinical setting as structured workplace learning activities reinforced by a theoretical context developed during periods of academic study. Clinical placements are arranged at a number of hospitals both NHS and private throughout Kent and East Sussex including Canterbury, Dartford, Maidstone, Gillingham, Margate, Ashford, Hastings, Eastbourne and Tunbridge Wells. Specialist experience may also be gained at other centres within the region.

Theoretical and Practical Knowledge and Skill

Radiographic practice is based on a scientific theoretical base which spans the physical, biological, social and behavioural disciplines. The links between theory and application to practice are at the forefront of the rationale underpinning the structure and content of the programme.

Personal and Professional Development

Technological advances and changing patterns of health and social care have given radiographers unique opportunities to advance the boundaries of radiographic practice. The basis for these role developments is rooted in effective education.

The Diagnostic Radiography programme has been designed to ensure graduating practitioners have the professional, educational and personal skills necessary to meet the challenges of the future.

Development of Research Knowledge and Skills

An integral part of the Diagnostic Radiography programme is the development of sound research skills which encourage and enable practitioners to evaluate and improve professional practice throughout their career. In addition to basic research skills students will consider the ethical issues related to clinically based research and the importance of enquiry into issues which cross the professional boundaries.

Fees

2015/16 and 2016/17

All places on this course for entry in academic years 2015/16 and 2016/17 are NHS bursary funded for Home and EU students only.

There are no tuition fees payable and you may be eligible for a maintenance bursary:

2017/18

We recognise that in the Government’s Spending Review, on 25 November 2015, changes are going to be made to the funding for nursing, midwifery and allied health professions pre-registration education for the academic year 2017/18.

Full details are to be confirmed by the Government and we will update our web pages as information becomes available.

The current information detailed in the Government’s Department of Health NHS Bursary Reform Paper issued on 9th December states that:

  • From 1st August 2017 new nursing, midwifery and allied health students will no longer receive NHS bursaries. Instead, they will have access to the same student loans system as other students.
  • Under the loans system, students on nursing, midwifery and allied health courses will receive around a 25% increase in the financial support available to them for living costs. The precise change for individuals will be dependent on their circumstances – for example, where they study, the length of the course, income and residency.
  • The Department of Health intends that students studying nursing, midwifery and the allied health subjects as a second degree will also be able to get student loans.
  • Repayment terms are expected to be the same as for students on the standard loans system. Graduates become eligible to pay back their loans in the April after they graduate, and then they will have to pay back only 9% of their earnings over £21,000 per year. For example a graduate on a salary of £21,700 per year would pay £5.25 per month. If income drops below £21,000 for any reason, for example part-time working or a career break, repayments stop. Any outstanding balance on student loans is written off by the government 30 years after the graduate becomes eligible for repayment (in the April after graduation).

The Council of Deans of Health has also issued some background information for students. View the website for further details.

The Government has not announced any changes to funding for students applying to study in academic years 2015/16 and 2016/17.

Additional course costs

Although we aim to minimise any additional costs to students over and above the course tuition fee, there will be some additional costs which students on courses are expected to meet. 

  • Students on this programme may incur travel and accommodation costs whilst on placement. These costs can be reclaimed by students from the NHSBSA.
  • Students on this programme will also be required to wear uniform in practice whilst on placement. The cost of the uniform is funded by the NHS.  

Read further information about the general additional costs which apply to courses at Canterbury Christ Church University. 

About half the time students are on clinical placement, mostly in an imaging department where they experience the full range of imaging techniques and modalities. They develop a wider understanding of the health care setting and the needs of patients through placements in setting such as the ambulance service, wards and A&E. Placement is in blocks, three in years 1 and 2 and two in year 3. When they are at University, they attend on average for three days a week and the remaining time is for study. They have experience of lectures, seminars, group work and technology-enhanced learning. They are also taught in the skills lab, a simulated and safe clinical environment where they learn clinical skills.

Students have a range of assessments – written work in a variety of formats, presentations, exams etc. They keep a reflective log of their time as a student and also have to pass an assessment of practice in each year that accounts for up to half of each module. All the assessments are designed to help students learn as well as be assessed, and feedback is given in a supportive way to help them develop their knowledge and skills.

Recruitment for this course considers not only the values of the specific profession you are wishing to join, but also the values of the wider NHS. You can expect to be shortlisted and interviewed based upon these values as well as course/profession specific requirements.  More information on values can be found here.

Applicants need to demonstrate a basic understanding of diagnostic radiography and show that it is a well-considered career choice for them. Suitable applicants are invited into the University for an information session and interview. Prior to interview all candidates should visit a clinical imaging department for at least 1 day.

Interview process: At interview, students will be expected to talk about Diagnostic Radiography as a career. They should possess an understanding of the personal qualities and skills required by a radiographer and have an awareness of current issues affecting health and social care.

Offers of a place can only be made after a successful interview, subject to satisfactory health clearance and Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check.

Fact file

UCAS code

  • B821

Length

  • 3 years full-time

Starts

  • September 2016 (Canterbury)

    April 2017 (Medway)

    Please note: April 2017 is the final April intake. From September 2017, all future intakes will be September only.

Entry requirements

  • A typical offer would be BBC at A2 Level, or equivalent
    GCSE English Language and Mathematics, at grade C or above, or equivalent
    Science at A2 Level or equivalent is advantageous, but not essential
    More entry requirement details.

Location

School

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Last edited: 29/06/2016 11:11:00