animation-production-570

BA single honours Animation Production 2018/19

Year of entry

Great news!

We now have planning permission to build a new £12m arts facility in Canterbury, equipped with the latest technology and bespoke learning spaces for our arts and humanities students. We expect our new arts building to open on the main campus in September 2018, with building work starting this summer.

Find out more about these specialist facilities in our video.

Animation Production is taught in the School of Media, Art and Design’s specialist facilities, which include high specification Apple Macs, professional-standard DSLR cameras, Dragonframe software for stop-frame animation and access to full Adobe Creative Suite software.

"Animation surrounds us on a daily basis, whether on television, billboards, websites, or your mobile phone. By studying Animation Production you will gain skills and confidence to engage with this media landscape in both practical and critical ways."

Senior Lecturer Dr Chris Pallant

If you are looking for a course that teaches a combination of digital, hand-drawn and model-based animation skills within an industry-focused context, BA Animation Production would be an excellent choice. You will receive practical tuition in the creative processes that underpin the animated form including scriptwriting, storyboarding, cinematography, drawing, modelling, animating, editing, and production management. You will also deepen your understanding of the animated form through complementary contextual, historical, and theoretical study. In this way, you will develop professional skills and understandings of the entire animation production process, which will equip you to compete for a wide range of technical, creative and production-based jobs in animation-focused industries.

Dr Chris Pallant is currently Vice-President of the Society for Animation Studies and has published three books about animation: Demystifying Disney (2011), Animated Landscapes: History, Form and Function (2015) and Storyboarding: A Critical History (2015).

You can study French, German, Italian, Mandarin Chinese and Spanish as part of, or alongside, your course.

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You will study a range of modules that develop your skills and understandings of animation production and the many career opportunities that are available. Year 1 will provide you with an introduction to digital and non-digital forms of animation; Year 2 will deepen your expertise and knowledge of the animated form; and Year 3 will provide you with an opportunity to work on a major animation project. Regular visits from professional animation practitioners will enrich your studies and offer valuable up-to-the-minute insights into industry skills and practices.

Core modules

Year 1

Introduction to Digital Animation

You will be introduced to the traditional principles of animation and develop your skills with 2D animation software. You will create a short animation on a specified theme, which will build your understanding of the animation production process.

Animation Principles

You will explore the principles of animation production through a series of short critical reflections and practical exercises. Mastering these principles will provide a solid foundation for your work across all forms of animation: 2D, 3D, stop-motion, and hand-drawn.

Visual Recording and Research

In this module you will develop the technical and perceptual skills necessary for visual analysis, selection and representation. You will apply increasingly sophisticated methods, including photography, 2D, 3D and digital-media, to develop an objective and informed methodology for visual recording. You will also engage in critical debate about the nature of perception and strategies for representing the physical world.

Creative Literacy

You will be introduced to the creative design process, initially by exploring case-study animations and related creative projects. Once you have gained a top-level overview sequential workshops will lead you through the design process stage by stage in including research, idea generation, concept development, prototyping, evaluation and testing, presentation and completion.

Animation: Contextual and Historical Perspectives 1

You will explore the dynamic and evolving nature of animation and evaluate the relationship of animation to other art forms and to the broader context of visual culture. You will also develop an understanding of the work of a range of ground-breaking animators and animations.

Animation Production

You will develop your understanding of a range of animation techniques from the most basic 2D techniques to the use of software such as Adobe After Effects. You will work individually and in groups to produce a short animation showreel.

Year 2

2D Computer Animation

This module explores frame by frame rotoscoping and other computer animation techniques using a variety of software. Workshops will cover areas including lip synching and walk cycles as well as focusing on the principles of animation. The techniques that you learn will be used to create a short 2D animation on a specified theme.

3D Computer Animation

You will be introduced to the basics of 3D computer animation, modelling, texturing and rigging, which will equip you to create a short 3D animation.

Animation: Contextual and Historical Perspectives 2

This module is designed to deepen your knowledge of the context and history of animation by exploring what has made animation so central to the creative industries and to contemporary culture.

Creative Film Practice

The module develops your skills and understandings of specialist moving image production and post-production technologies, which will allow you to develop a short creative film from initial concept to post production.

Year 3

Work Related Learning

The module helps to prepare you for employment in the creative sector by developing your awareness of commercial expectations and practices, presentation and pitching, CV writing, portfolio management and team-working. The module also allows you to apply skills and understandings developed on the programme in a work-related environment.

Pre-Production for Final Project

This module is the pre-production phase of your Final Project. You will follow industry-standard planning and pre-production processes to produce an appropriate project ‘pitch’ or proposal. You will develop the proposal into a pre-production portfolio comprising a collection of supporting materials specific to your production role in the Final Project.

Final Project

The Final Project is a double module that gives you the opportunity to synthesise the technical expertise you have acquired throughout the programme to work as part of a team to create an ambitious professional production. The Final Project will add to your showreel and act as your ‘calling card’ when seeking professional employment.

Critical Practices

This module gives you the opportunity to reflect critically on your practice during your programme of study. You will evaluate your creative workflow and how your practice has been effective for your chosen target audiences. You will also have the opportunity to evaluate how your work fits within the broader creative landscape.

Likely optional modules

Year 2

Global Experience in Media, Art and Design

You will develop your appreciation of cultural differences and how these affect your professional practice by carrying out a media project abroad. To complete the project you will need to apply the skills that you have learned on the programme so far, and engage with the host culture.

Industry Perspectives

This module aims develops your understanding of the creative sector as an industry by making you aware of key dynamics within the sector and its expectations in relation to employment. You will learn about working practices and structures, team working, inter-personal skills, freelancing and collaborative work, funding streams, developing portfolios, studio setup, taxation, regulation, law and ethics.

Editing Practice and Theory

This module develops your critical understanding of the process of editing through practical exercises and the analysis of cinematic texts. The module introduces you to the theory of editing and provides practical opportunities for you to develop your understanding of the importance of the editing process in film and television production.

Screenwriting

Screenwriting provides you with the opportunity to study the theory and practice of the craft of scriptwriting. You will learn the techniques of scriptwriting and build your creative skills to make original and imaginative dramatic narratives while also studying a variety of theoretical approaches to scriptwriting.

Cinematography: Designing the Frame

You will gain practical hands-on experience of moving-image production technologies and learn how to light, control exposure and compose for the camera. The module is delivered through practical workshops, lectures & screenings.

Year 3

Group Production: Re-Animating the Music Video

You will work collaboratively as part of a group production unit to produce a music video to a set brief in a short time span. This module replicates the professional experience of working on a serial animation production where timely collaboration is crucial. The brief will be to re-animate a popular music video, as voted for by the student group, with the aim of producing a new portmanteau video that showcases the varied animation tastes of the class as a whole.

Mixed Media Dissertation

This module develops your skills in research, analysis and the construction of an academic argument through the production of a mixed media dissertation on a chosen subject relevant to animation. A mixed media dissertation may take the form of a written dissertation or an alternate practical form, for example an animation that introduces theoretical concepts.

BA Animation Production is designed to introduce you to a wide range of animation aesthetics and contexts. The skills you will gain are useful in a broad range of professional environments and are transferable across a wide range of careers where critical awareness and technical knowledge are essential requirements. The programme would also provide a foundation for postgraduate study at Canterbury Christ Church University or elsewhere.

Tuition Fees for 2018/19 have not yet been finalised - please read the 2018/19 Tuition Fee Statement for further information regarding 2018/19 tuition fees and year on year fee increases.

Fees

Additional course costs

Although we aim to minimise any additional costs to students over and above the course tuition fee, there will be some additional costs which students are expected to meet.

Costs applicable to all students

CategoryDescription
Text books Own purchase text books
Travel to other sites Where travel to other sites is required, this will be payable by the student
Library Fees and Fines Where students fail to return loaned items within the required time they will be responsible for the cost of any Library Fees and Fines applicable
Printing & Photocopying The cost of printing and photocopying undertaken by students to support their individual learning are payable by the student
Graduation ceremonies It is free for the student to attend the ceremony itself. Guest tickets and robe hire / photography are additional costs payable by the student

Course specific costs

CategoryDescription
Text books No purchase is mandatory.

General principle policy

The University’s general principles policy for additional course fees are set out here

CategoryIncluded in the tuition feeAdditional cost to student
Field trips (including trips abroad and trips to museums, theatres, workshops etc) Yes, if the trip contributes to the course (whether it is part of an optional or compulsory module), but not including food and drink. Yes, if the trip is not an essential part of the course but is offered as an enhancement or enrichment activity, or for a student’s personal development.
Travel and accommodation costs for placements  No

Travel and accommodation costs for professional placements within the Education and Health & Wellbeing Faculties.

Travel and accommodation costs for other work placements. 
Text books No Own purchase text books.
DBS / Health checks No Yes
Professional Body registration No Yes
Travel to other sites (e.g. travel to swimming pool for lessons) No Yes
Clothing / Kit Yes, where the clothing / kit is essential for Health & Safety reasons. Yes, where the clothing is kept by the student and not essential for health and safety reasons.
Learning materials Essential learning materials (excluding text books) in connection with the course. Additional materials beyond the standard provision essential for the course or where the costs are determined by the student’s area of interest and the outputs are retained by the student.
Library fees and fines No Yes
Printing and photocopying No Yes
Social events No, unless the event forms an essential part of the course. Yes, unless the event forms an essential part of the course.
Graduation ceremonies It is free for the student to attend the ceremony itself. Guest tickets and robe hire/ photography are additional costs payable by the student.

Composition of the Course

You will be taught through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, screenings and workshops.

Each year of the programme is made up of modules totalling 120 credits. Each 20-credit module has up to 50 hours of directed learning including lectures, seminars, workshops, one-to-one and group tutorials and feedback on assignments. Teaching is supported by online resources containing suggestions for reading, ideas for class discussion and guidance on preparation for lectures, seminars and assignments. The online resources help you to learn flexibly and in a way that suits you and are of central importance to the delivery of independent creative practice and project work. You are also expected to put in 150 hours of self-¬directed study and practical work for each 20-credit module.

Academic input

The teaching team is a mix of theoreticians and professional practitioners. Visiting speakers from the animation industry will present guest lectures and masterclasses.

You will be assessed by a combination of practical, spoken and written assignments.

We now have planning permission to build a new £12m arts facility in Canterbury, equipped with the latest technology and bespoke learning spaces for our arts and humanities students.

We expect our new arts building to open on the main campus in September 2018, with building work starting this summer.

Our main campus in Canterbury has city centre facilities on its doorstep and, of course, you will benefit from all the new arts building has to offer.


Animation Production is taught in the School of Media, Art and Design’s specialist facilities, which include high-specification Apple Macs, professional standard DSLR cameras, Dragonframe software for stop-frame animation and access to full Adobe Creative Suite software.

The School runs an international animation festival, Canterbury Anifest. Students on Animation Production will be encouraged to get involved with the festival whether through free attendance, helping to run the festival or by submitting their animated films for consideration in the Student Film category of the Anifest Awards.

Fact file

UCAS code

  • W616 Animation Production, BA - 2018/19

Institutional code

  • C10

Length

  • 3 years full-time

Starts

  • September 2018

Entry requirements

Location

School

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Last edited: 21/08/2017 13:52:00