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Constructing a way forward: innovation in theory and practice for career guidance

ISBN 978-1-899253-29-6

The Occasional Paper can be downloaded here.|

Edited by Hazel Reid

This occasional paper is the sixth in a series of papers published by the Centre for Career and Personal Development.

This occasional paper offers a collection of articles resulting from presentations given at a conference of the same title held at the Salomons campus in June 2007.  The aim of the conference was to bring together practitioners, managers, researchers, trainers and academics in order to explore innovative thinking and practice in the field of career guidance.  All the papers deal with 'innovation' in one form or another. 

Tony Watts, in chapter 1, reviews the new arrangements for career education and guidance in England, in the light of recent reports and a NICEC survey.  In chapter 2, Bill Law, draws out the potential for using narratives to enable people in terms of their own career management. The work points to practical steps that are suggested by narrative thinking and sets outs a particular narrative technique - called 'storyboarding'.  Hazel Reid and Linden West, in chapter 3, also draw on narrative as well as auto/biographical  approaches for understanding career behaviour and outline a project which is exploring the approach with a group of practitioners.  In chapter 4, Jenny Bimrose, details the findings from the third year of a five year qualitative, longitudinal case study which is investigating the nature of effective guidance.

Chapter 5 outlines Barbara Bassot's recent research into the career trajectories of two women, both of whom can be said to have achieved much in relation to what society might have expected of them.  In chapter 6, Alison Fielding and Jane Westergaard discuss the practice of supervision and mentoring for practitioner well being.  In chapter 7, Anthony Barnes and Anne Chant discuss the place of guidance within the extended schools agenda and finally in chapter 8, Lucy Marris outlines how Labour Market Information  has been brought 'centre stage' by recent policy in relation to career guidance provision.

Change, which appears inevitable in a post-modern society, requires innovative thinking; or in the words of Albert Einstein, 'We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them'.  There is plenty of innovative thinking in the paper.

Copies of this paper may be purchased for £12.00 which includes postage and packaging.  Cheques should be made payable to Canterbury Christ Church University and sent to:

Occasional Papers, Centre for Career and Personal Development, David Salomons Estate, Broomhill Road, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent.  TN3 0TG