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Our history

History of Teach First at Canterbury Christ Church University

2002 – 2006: Canterbury Christ Church University works in partnership to set up the Teach First project and provides the training for the London region 'participants' as they work towards Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). 

2006: New regions: North West, East and West Midlands join the programme and Canterbury Christ Church University becomes the National Training Provider, as well as remaining the Regional Training Provider for London.

2008: The Teach First Primary route is piloted, with training provided by Canterbury Christ Church University.

2009: The Yorkshire region joins the programme and Canterbury Christ Church University takes a new national role within the new National Initial Teacher Training Partnership. Canterbury Christ Church University now works in collaboration with the Institute of Education, the University of Warwick, the Specialist Schools and Academies Trust and the Training and Development Agency (TDA), as well as Teach First itself. Canterbury Christ Church University also continues to be the training provider for the large London region. With effect from the 2009-10 cohort, participants can be awarded a Post Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) in addition to QTS.

2011: New region: North East. Teach First Primary route is established across other regions. Canterbury Christ Church University is now joined by the Institute of Education and King's College London as partner institutes for the delivery of the Teach First Initial Teaching Training Programme for the London Region.

2012: New Region: Kent & Medway. In addition to our partnership in the London region, Canterbury Christ Church University becomes the sole provider for the Kent & Medway Region.

2013: Expansion of the Teach First Programme sees two new regions joining – the South West and Wales. Expansion of the Kent & Medway Region into schools in Hastings and St Leonard's in East Sussex led to the region being renamed the South East Region.